Negative Effects Of Neolithic Farming

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Mesolithic foragers hunted their food, lived an active lifestyle and rarely fell ill because of disease. Food was plentiful, resources were naturally rich and communities were widespread. Neolithic farmers brought new technologies and tools, ideologies and wisdom, life ways and languages. The Neolithic agriculturalists provided the spur of development for the human species. The early Neolithic agricultural practices allowed the human species to adopt a dominant role on the planet over others. Following early farming practices came both positive and negative side effects. Disease, poor human health and environmental degradation including deforestation emerged among dense agricultural populations. However, the domestication and animal husbandry, pyrotechnology and trade permitted …show more content…
Particular fauna and flora were innate suited to domestication providing useful food sources. With expansive yet condensed populations, animal husbandry provided a rich, stable food supply. An example of early animal domestication is of North African cattle in c. 8000 BCE in the Sahara desert when it had adequate water sources. Additional animals that were domesticated over 7000 years ago included camels, chickens, horses, goats, sheep, llamas and buffalo. Common crops included maize, rice, wheat and millet.
The major benefit of animal husbandry and agriculture was the stable food supply that enabled more people to survive childhood and eat regularly. In addition to heightened food resources, agriculture encouraged the trade of food, even animals, for manufactured goods and rare commodities. A prevalent disease shared between animals and humans is influenza which spreads quickly and can survive multiple environmental types. During the European conquest, pigs carrying Eurasian diseases made first contact with the people of the Americas. A highly devastating reaction was experienced by the people

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