Devoplement of the United States Within the Time Periods 1700-1800

1729 Words Aug 11th, 2012 7 Pages
Development of the United States in the period 1700-1800


The purpose of this essay is to explain the historical development of the Thirteen colonies in the time period 1700-1800. It will be shown that the development of the colonies of the south and north differed in this time period. As the colonies developed, the need for independence grew leading to the Revolutionary war in 1776. Slavery was very diverse. In the south slavery was separated into two subcultures: the upper south and lower south. Slavery, however in the north was less vital to the colonial economy. In 1760 monarchism was well established in American culture. Americans were proud of their British culture. In most aspects colonies were already governing themselves for
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Although they had some authority, they were also a part of a larger British empire. Colonial assemblies came to act like and think of themselves as mini-parliaments, with full legislative power over local-matters.
(Pgs.70-71 Keene)
The British victory against the French and Indian war in 1763 assured America from an attack from French. Having to deal with an expensive war with the French, British were found in a situation where they had to raise funds to pay off their war debt. There were several events leading to the British outbreak for independence. In 1763 The new prime minister, George Grenville was not pleased with the outcome of an investigation of the colonial revenues. Grenville was determined to generate additional income by enforcing existing laws and making new ones. The colonist were not happy about these changes.
One of the first steps towards Grenville’s new program was The Revenue Tax (1764) also known as the Sugar Act. The Sugar Act lowered duties colonist had to pay for molasses but taxed sugar and other goods imported to the colonies, it also increased penalties for smuggling. Violators could be prosecuted in British courts. The Sugar Act was seen as a violation of rights by many English men. They believed that the Sugar Act violated two long term held…

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