Alzheimer's Disease: A Psychological Study

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The study of psychology involves studying the mind and behaviour of people. Researchers test individuals based on questions they have about why people behave and think the way the do. Part of this, is how the brain works together to perform these day-to-day actions. However, there are many situations that challenge the performance of actions. A common challenge that occurs in middle ages people is the Alzheimer’s Disease. The Alzheimer 's Disease is a serious condition that affects the loss of brain cell connections that connect short-term memories that are needed to form long-term memories. While studying the Alzheimer’s Disease, one will see that within an individual 's brain there are many parts that are affected by the disease. It is an …show more content…
The loss of ability performed by these lobes, cause symptoms that result in the Alzheimer’s Disease. In collaboration with each other, these parts all have special abilities that related them all each other. By this it is meant that such things as the ability to think cognitive thoughts involve most parts of the brain such as the ones that are affected by the Alzheimer’s Disease. The Alzheimer’s Disease decreases the ability to perform cognitive symptoms and unconscious tasks, such as thinking of this off the top of your head or short term memories where things that were just learnt are carried out as. In addition, to the parietal lobe that controls our senses of touch awareness, other lobes such as the frontal and temporal lobes are affected in the same way. This is because each of these control just a third of what controls our conscious voluntary movements. Such movements involve little things like snapping ones finger, or more difficult actions such as dancing. To remember how to perform these actions involves memories that need to be stored into long-term memories. The Alzheimer’s Disease however, hinders these abilities. This then results in the lack of motivation to perform once daily actives, which is affiliated with the parietal lobe, and also in depression from the frontal lobe, and other signs from the temporal …show more content…
They believe that if waited long term, the disease will harm the individuals brain on a cellular level, which is basic cells that create the formation of the brain. The researchers of this article have “hypothesis by addressing the pathophysiological changes underlying the early and almost invariant appearance of the neurofibrillary tangles, the only reliable correlate of the cognitive status, in distinct brain areas and their consistent “spread” along interconnected neurons as the disease advances” (Neuroscience, 2013). This means that they have noticed that the neuron connections can be saved if caught early. This article provides a clear understanding of why it is important to receive help in the beginning stages of the Alzheimer’s Disease. Other articles such as, “The Three Stages of Alzheimer’s Disease,” suggest that there is not a defined “right time for therapeutic intervention due to obstacles in defining the right population” (The Lancet, 2011). The article also provides valuable data and suggests that “the lack of an effective treatment beyond some alleviation of symptoms make Alzheimer 's disease an urgent research and public health priority” (The Lancet, 2011). While researching the relation of the parts of the brain that are affected by the Alzheimer’s

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