Conclusion Poetry Analysis

Improved Essays
Introduction While some dictionaries define the word right as ‘a privilege’ but when used in the context of ‘human rights’, it talks about something more basic. Everyone is entitled to certain fundamental rights, simply because of being human. These are called human rights rather than just ‘a privilege’ which can be taken away at someone’s caprice. They are ‘rights’ because they are things you are allowed to do, to be or to have. These rights are there for our protection against people who might want to hurt or harm us. These are also there to help us get along with each other and let one live in peace. When human rights are not well known by people abuses such as injustice, discrimination, oppression, intolerance and slavery can arise. …show more content…
Conclusion Poetry, though, may be considered by some as dull, drab and a mere abstract literary reserved and is only enjoyed by a few whimsical and eccentrics. However for human rights communities worldwide, poetry like any other literary genre has become a medium of advocacy. It is an artistic form of expression which conveys a message that ordinary people can relate to. There is no right or wrong way to write a poem. No one can tell someone what and how they are supposed to write their own feeling and views of reality. As in poetry one can express what is within him or her. Poetry appeals to one’s moral sensitivity and sanity to evoke the unspoken and serves like a voice of the universal conscience. Poetry has the ability to reflect the innermost sentiments of heart and soul. Human rights issues in poetry are usually based on traumatic and horrifying conditions. However poetry also serves to demonstrate the creativity, ingenuity and resilience of the human spirits. While depicting the doom and gloom, and pain and grief, it can also bring with it the freshness of hope in the face of the intolerance, slavery, injustice, cruelty, discrimination and oppression. The artistic and literary genre like poetry is also a powerful instrument to point …show more content…
In this respect, poetry is superior, both to history and philosophy. For philosophy presents merely abstract precepts, which cannot be understood by the young. And History deals with concrete facts or examples of virtue, but from these facts the readers must themselves derive the universal and general truths. But poetry combines both these advantages. It presents universal truths, like philosophy, but it does them through concrete examples like, History. Its general truths can be easily understood for they are conveyed through examples, and its examples are drawn from an ideal world and so are more vivid and effective. It teaches virtue in a way intelligible even to the ordinary men. Hence, just like any other forms of poetry, such as religious poetry, which praises God, philosophy and informative poetry, which imparts knowledge of philosophy, history, astronomy, etc. pastoral poetry, which deals with the lowliest life and thus arouses sympathy and admiration for simple life and hatred for acts of cruelty and tyranny, elegiac poetry arouses sympathy for suffering and the miserable. It softens the heart. Similarly, the human rights poetry also serves its best

Related Documents

  • Improved Essays

    Socrates Poetry Analysis

    • 743 Words
    • 3 Pages

    Plato has beliefs that do not separate aesthetics from ethics because his concerns with poetry are purely ethical. Nehamas believes this causes a significant philosophical embarrassment because it suggests Plato does not understand the real value of art and that there is much more than just the ethical part of the art. Furthermore, Plato makes his greatest objection against poetry because the kind of person that one would be ashamed to resemble because of unethical behavior is admired in poetry. Socrates states that instant gratification is the cause of this absurd line of thinking among…

    • 743 Words
    • 3 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Improved Essays

    Of the content, Hegel believes it is wholly accidental and the only important thing is the poet’s treatment and presentation of such ideas (p.. Here I wonder, as Hegel never explicitly argues on implied meaning, whether the reader is meant to disregard their own relations and derivations of the poem’s meaning and submit to the poet’s intended meaning? If this is true, then I feel strongly that this is a shortcoming of his theory, as the pleasure in reading The Disappointment is directly correlated with the associations and relations of each of the particular aspects–form, content, sounds, rhythm. The mood or general reflection aroused poetically by the external object forms the centre of the “spirit”,…

    • 1070 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Improved Essays

    Myth, Music And Poetry

    • 859 Words
    • 4 Pages

    A myth’s nature in itself may cause the orator of said myth to question the explanations detailed within the story. It must be reiterated how an analysis of obscure mythic structures must be familiar with the culture of the ethnographic context (Douglas 1967: 66). The same sense of familiarity must also be applied to music and poetry. Again, the example of Suyá song shows that because music is an essential part of social production to the Suyá, its value can in no way be easily comparable to societies that treat music as a mere aesthetic novelty. It is no surprise that a lack of critical self-consciousness leads to “misreading of particular situations, either through ethnocentric and anachronistic projects of the key ideas onto the lives of people who think and act quite different…” (Rouse 1995: 352).…

    • 859 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Superior Essays

    The poet relates what may happen within the laws of probability. He universalizes particular facts and invests solidity on transient happenings. Poetry is superior to history and philosophy because it teaches us what should happen and the moral truth but not what has happened as history does. For Sidney poetry is ancient and superior to other branches. From the neo-classist point of view towards Shakespeare and the nature of dramatic illusion.…

    • 2262 Words
    • 10 Pages
    Superior Essays
  • Great Essays

    Sidney begins his defence against the charge that poetry is not a ‘fruitful’ knowledge by redefining the status of poetry, claiming ‘neither philosopher nor historiographer could at the first have entered into the gates of popular judgements if they had not taken a great passport of poetry.’ (Sidney, p.1047) Through this depiction of poetry, philosophy and history become a consequence of poetry’s merits, as Sidney implies the knowledge that poetry contains was essential in their dominant status as forms of knowledge. Sidney further dismisses the primacy of philosophy, arguing that ‘the philosopher teacheth, but he teacheth obscurely, so as the learned only can understand him, that is to say, he teacheth them that are already taught; but the poet is the food for the tenderest stomachs,’ (Sidney, p.1057) Poetry is portrayed as more accessible in this depiction, while the nature of philosophy is presented as self-indulgent and less legitimate, as it cannot be accessed by those who are not ‘learned’ (Sidney, p.1057). It is therefore conveyed that poetry is more enticing to readers, it is ‘food for the tenderest stomachs’ and implies that it ‘teaches more effectively than philosophy.’ (Lamb, p.506) Sidney pushes the reader further as he claims ‘of all sciences’ poetry is ‘the monarch. For he doth not only show the way, but giveth so sweet a…

    • 2396 Words
    • 10 Pages
    Great Essays
  • Improved Essays

    Poem Analysis: Dover Beach

    • 1040 Words
    • 5 Pages

    This "faith" seems to have guided decisions and smoothed over the world's problems, tying everyone together in a meaningful way. It is no coincidence that the sight inspiring such reflection is that of untouched nature, almost entirely absent from any human involvement. In fact, the speaker's true reflection begins once the only sign of life, the light over in France, disappears. What Arnold is expressing is a natural drive towards beauty. He explores this contradiction through what is possibly the poem's most famous stanza, that which compares his experience to that of Sophocles.…

    • 1040 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Improved Essays

    Consequently, Beowulf has an unreliable narrator that is mistaken about the poem and is not internationally unreliable. Beowulf has an unreliable narrator because the whole story is too convenient for Beowulf…

    • 902 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Improved Essays

    The effects of well used poetic techniques in this poem create emotions like sympathy and downheartedness. In ‘We wear the mask ' we see stylistic choices like metaphors, imagery, alliteration, figurative language and the way it 's structured in the form, rondeau. These particular techniques are displayed throughout the poem as the title ‘We wear the mask’ is a metaphor for hiding true feelings and not staying true to yourself. It creates an image of what the poem is going to be about and sets the scene. Through using this metaphor, the reader is put into the position to feel sincere condolence towards the black culture and pity towards the mistreatment of the beliefs of the African American culture.…

    • 1007 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Superior Essays

    Colin Mitchell Williams is, so to be said, a nobody poet. He is found on poetrysoup.com, which really is, as it says, a giant soup of unknown and known poets and their work. His username is his full name, but without capitalization. In a two-part, free-verse set titled “Senseless”, Williams, as one of the common people, calls out the entirety of humanity, including himself, for its senselessness. Senseless not only as the ability to harm others for seemingly no reason, but also as the state of being sympathetically numb to the suffering around them.…

    • 1161 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Superior Essays
  • Improved Essays

    He Was My Everything “Stop all the Clocks” is a beautifully compelling poem by W. H. Auden. It is a eulogy of sorts, but also a love poem. It is compelling because of the way Auden manipulates language through metaphors. He refrains from using similes because metaphors are the stronger method of comparison. The strength of metaphors comes from their layered meanings, their subjective meanings, and their structure; they are what make this poem powerful.…

    • 795 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Improved Essays