Hobbes Vs Rousseau Essay

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Hobbes and Rousseau both look at the social contract in similar views as they each see
Hobbes argues that political authority and obligation are based on the individual self-interests of members of society who are understood to be equal to one another, with no single individual invested with any essential authority to rule over the rest, while at the same time maintaining the conservative position that the sovereign must be ceded absolute authority if society is to survive. This is best seen in ADD QUOTE AND THEN ANALYZE IT REALLY SPECIFICALLY. Hobbes sees human nature as equivalent to the natural state and untainted. Hobbes clearly defines the social contract as granting full equality to all men and does not recognize any differences as
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If someone disobeys the law it is best solved by the popular opinion and believes in the direct interaction of the people with the laws they must obey. Rousseau uses collectivism as a way for people to actively present their own views while also using This collectivism is best exemplified in his definition of the “general will”. He calls for all members of society to subordinate their own will for the general goal set forth by society. Rousseau does not believe that surrendering freedom to a leader provides any benefit and encourages intervention by the individual on a political level. With Rousseau believes that these goals can only be realized with the assumption of a great leader into the seat of power. With a great leader laws can be established and thus, enforcement of laws is not a restriction on individual liberty: the individual, as a citizen, explicitly agreed to be constrained if, as a private individual, he did not respect his own will as formulated in the general will. Because laws represent the restraints of civil freedom, they represent the leap made from humans in the state of nature into civil society. In this sense, the law is a civilizing force, and therefore Rousseau believed that the laws that govern a people helped to mold their

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