Compare And Contrast Medieval Japanese And Medieval Europe

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Medieval Europe from 500-1500CE and Shogunate Japan from 710-to the late 15th century were two very similar places in history. They both had unfair punishments and used the feudal system, which was not a very fair system, especially if you were at the bottom of the pyramid. They both had rulers who were important in their countries. The King was at the top of the medieval pyramid and the Emperor was the ruler of the Japanese. However, being a king in Europe was more respected because he had so much more power than a Japanese Emperor so it would be better to be a king King rather than an Emperor.

The medieval kings were the ones that controlled the country they were in. They usually became king because they were the ones who had conquered
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He could not control lots of things within the country. He was just in a symbolic position. All the emperor had to do was appoint Minamoto Yorimoto. He took most of the power that the emperor previously had like commanding the soldiers. The Emperor as a result didn’t have enough power to be a good leader. But the European King on the other hand, could control whatever he wanted as he ruled everything. He could send an army off to war unlike the Japanese emperor. When the king was rebelled against he did not lose his power he just had to sign the Magna Carta, which was an agreement where he is not allowed to trial people unfairly and he wasn’t allowed to make big s=decisions without consulting the Lords. This picture shows the document the king had to sign it was called the Magna Carta. All the Lords and peasants wanted the king to sign it so that they all had to be trialed fairly and not just be sentenced straight away like being tortured or killed. This was because the king had all the control and peasants wanted rights, as they were sick of being pushed around by the …show more content…
The king did not usually interact with the peasants. The king would tell the Lords what he wanted done and they would inform the peasants of their duties. The king would give the Lords the land and the peasants to work the land. He would instruct his knights on how to proceed in battles and showed them more respect than peasants. The Emperor did not have a lot to do with Shoguns, as they were more powerful. The Daimyo’s and Samurais protected the Emperor. Although he was not powerful but well regarded, he still did not have much to do with the peasants as he was sealed off from the outside world. This Painting shows the emperor being sealed of from the outside world demonstrating his isolation from most of the

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