Chomsky's Propaganda Theory

1993 Words 8 Pages
Chomsky’s propaganda model highlights the inherent conflict of interest between the powerful - namely government and major financial institutions - and the general population with corporately structured news media. His theory frames private media not as a reputable outlet of quality information, but rather as a conglomeration of profit-seeking organizations that align their story production with the interests of the political and economic elites; this occurs at the expense of the regular public, who often unknowingly act as the recipients of propaganda propagated by these agenda-focused broadcasts. In addition to identifying the purpose of contemporary mass media, Chomsky also postulates five general filters that determine the type of news …show more content…
This model applies to a wide array of press coverages; certain events, like the Iraq War, underscore the blatant biases of media, and also the government’s hand in influencing the ideas of news conglomerates. Bill Moyers’ - another vehement critic of corporate media - Buying the [Iraq] War showcases Chomsky’s filters acting in full capacity, emphasizing how the alliance between politicians and news institutions allowed for the heavy promotion of pro-war ideas, and the quick suppression of dissenters. The size of big media corporations creates a bias, and effectively silences the voices of smaller news institutions. In the contemporary mass media industry, large businesses or conglomerates dominate; well-endowed through …show more content…
In an effort to generate justification and support for the invasion of Iraq, the United States government pushed a fair amount of equivocal and misleading information as indisputable fact, chiefly Iraq’s possession of WMDs. The idea of Iraq harboring nuclear weaponry quickly became the go-to piece of evidence for a politicians and newscasters, and many citizens, including Jonathan Landay, a reporter for the Knight Ridder, accepted it as true. It was not until he dug deeper into the story, though, that he reversed his opinion; after analyzing U.N. weapon report written by inspectors, which indicated that towards the end of 1998 - when those inspectors halted their operations - intelligence agencies around the world had kept keeping a close watch over the country, he began to question the reality of WMD production occurring in a country under close global scrutiny. He noted that, to produce weapons on such a massive scale, they would need the proper materials and infrastructure, though the careful observation would render acquisition of those components a hardly possible task. Despite this, Dick Cheney, then Vice President, announced during a speech on August 26th, 2002 that the government confirmed the presence of nuclear

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