Satan In John Milton's Paradise Lost

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The antagonist Satan in John Milton’s “Paradise Lost” is undoubtedly the most psychologically complex, dynamic, manipulative, and yet sympathetic character in the history of literature. John Milton paints the reader a portrait of Satan’s character as someone who has several negative characteristics, (such as pride and vengeance) but who also possesses brilliant leadership skills. He is able to give speeches that inspire his followers to carry out evil deeds, but behind closed doors, he is revealed to be a very troubled and pained being. Satan’s valor, dignity as well as determination gives him all the qualities of a hero. Yet it is his pride fullness, unreapentive heart, and desire to create evil and chaos in the world that show the villain he truly is. Despite his complex qualities, Milton shows another side of Satan, an almost humanistic side that makes the reader sympathize with him, rather than see him for who he is: The Prince of Darkness. Book 1 of Paradise Lost begins with the author declaring the subject of his epic poem, Man’s …show more content…
Even through Satan has chosen to do evil, it is because he feels that he has been wronged by God. Despite this, he still has the ability in him to do good. When he first sets his eyes on Mankind, he says, “Into our room of bliss thus high advanced creatures of other mould, earth-born perhaps, not spirits, yet to heav’nly spirits bright little inferior; whom my thoughts pursue with wonder, and could love.” ( ) He has the ability to love, but chooses not to. Adam and Eve were created in the likeness of God, pure and good; and Satan hates them for it. When he looks at them he says, “so much more I feel the torment within me, as from the hateful siege of contraries: all good to me becomes Bane, and in Heav’n much worse would be my state.” This is a window into what he is feeling inside, making him less of a hateful

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