Rebecca Walker Being Real Analysis

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The readings that I am using for my critical thought paper are "Being Real: an introduction" by Rebecca Walker, and "m/other ourselves: a Black queer feminist genealogy for radical mothering" by Alexis Pauline Gumbs. In "Being Real", Rebecca Walker makes the argument that being a feminist does not require someone to fit within a designated space and that women (and men) do not have to limit themselves by what they believe to be feminist and non-feminist ways of living. Alexis Gumbs contends in "m/other ourselves", that mothering is "queer" and that it is the foundation of all movements toward social justice. When looking at how each author proves their idea, they are drastically different in their approach. Starting with Gumbs, she proceeds …show more content…
This question was stood out to me, as it made me look at how often I view mothering as a space in which only someone who is a woman or who identifies as such, can occupy. Now, I don't feel that this was an open invitation to take on the mantle as a mother, but rather an attempt to show mothering as a way in which we educate and stimulate children to take on issues that we may not currently able to solve. This then stems into two intertwined concepts, the first being that mothering is the foundation in which social justice rises, and second, which is that mothering is queer. To explain how mothering is the foundation of social justice, we look forward a page, to where Gumbs talks about organizations like Regenaracíon and Kidz City. These are two organizations see mothering as "the resistance work of child-raising", as in both they create a communal area in which the young and old gather and share their knowledge with each other, so as to create a better plan for the future (Gumbs 26). At this point to, we see how mothering is queer, because Gumbs shows how mothering is can transform "the parenting relationship a property relationship to a partnership in practice" (29). This is important to how I see …show more content…
Right off the bat, she begins the introduction by talking about the "feminist ghetto" she was in, as she attempted to live "up to an image [she] had in [her] mind of what was morally and politically right according to [her] vision of female empowerment" (Walker XXVIIII). To me, this statement shows her belief of how feminism can be constricting and even regressive when it is compartmentalized. In posing her writing first through her own perspective, Walker begins to create a setting in which readers can see her vulnerability and establish a sense of connection. This connectivity then allows for her to be able to champion ideas, that I assume at the time were, very counter feminist culture. Specifically, for Walker, she examines how even the most personal aspects of individuals life can be restricted as when a woman feels that "a feminist must never compromise herself" (Walker XXXIII). Whether it be in sexuality, material wants, familial aspirations, arts, etc., Walker shows how a woman can feel separated from the main group of feminists, as they have interests and enjoyment of things that fall out of a what they feel to be allowable within feminism. Walker continues to push her point as she talks about the many experiences of young men and

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