Barbie Analysis

1196 Words 5 Pages
When Ruth designed Barbie, she almost wanted her to be perfect, both physically and in lifestyle. In Barbie 's days of development and character production there were factors that affected how the doll was going to look to portray a certain life. Although they are seen as little things, Ruth wanted the doll to be an image to guide girls to adulthood. Those factors were that “the doll would be pretty, but not to the point the girl feels insecure. [Ruth] thought of the doll as a teen fashion model and to be a teeny-tiny mannequin, made with curves to enhance the way the clothes hang on them. [Ruth] only wanted beautiful, well made clothes [for her doll]” (Stone 26). Ruth’s reason for that high standard was simply because she “believed a girl …show more content…
Two perfect examples of this type would be from the movie Mean Girls with “[the] vindictive and witless stereotype plays a part. Leader of the “Plastics” [Regina George] the gorgeous but nasty blonde, the other blonde [Karen Smith], is the mindless blonde who obeys her every command [and never questions a thing]” (Stone 49). The two roles although similar have different aspects. Throughout the movie both girls were seen to have the best of everything from makeup to clothes, they were also the populars and Barbies of the school (hence the name “Plastics”). The second Barbie stereotype brought on by the media is the “dumb to Semi-Dumb blonde.” In the 2001 movie Legally Blonde “a [blonde girl named] Elle Woods finds her inner intelligence and transforms her beauty queen mentality into one of [a competent modern day female lawyer]”(Stone 50). By the end of the movie, although she graduates from law school, top of the class, she still has the “dumb blonde” mentality. Like Barbie, all three girls seemed to play the cliche of “the Airhead who consumes” (Spigel 316). Also, the roles would be nothing without the leads resembling Barbie in some physical or intellectual …show more content…
The Barbie both body and lifestyle was originally marketed to girls, but the doll also affected boys perception on the female. It seemed throughout history, gentlemen had preferred blondes. Some searched for a “woman with golden hair” and a “luminous eternal figure.” Men searched for the “perfect embodiment,” to the point that they projected the hunger and lust onto women like models, centerfolds, flight attendants, and aerobics instructors. All for the fact that look a little more like Barbie in some way, whether it be body or lifestyle. Since Barbie came onto the scene however, it gave boys a negative expectation of what the female body would look like naked. So much that when a male source“first saw a photograph of an actual naked woman with breasts unlike Barbies, which is to say breasts that didn 't meet her belly with the same convex slope with which they left the shoulders, [or] mounds of sugar breasts” he shivered at her poor deformity and wondered how God could have been so cruel (Stone 59). He and many men had reacted like this because Barbie’s body is the first “body” kids, both girl and boy, viewed when they were in adolescence. However, Barbie can never be more than a doll, because if she was a real human, she would not have the life or body the consumer 's dreamed for

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