The Importance Of The Six-Day War

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The Six-Day War, a short conflict pitting Israel against Egypt, Jordan, and Syria, was a decisive Israeli victory that stretched from the 5th through the 10th of June, 1967. Despite the short duration of the war, Israel greatly improved their military reputation worldwide, as well as gained significant territory within the region. While controversial in that Israel launched a preemptive strike against nations that had yet to engage, the Israeli tactics highlighted the importance of quick, decisive military operations and creative planning. Significant aspects of the conflict include the events leading up to the war, multi-front military operations and subsequent victories against all three opponents, and the lingering aftermath the Six-Day War had on the Middle East. …show more content…
Israel had already engaged in prolonged warfare with Arab coalitions, most notably during the 1948 Arab-Israeli War. Despite coming to a fragile peace agreement, Arab states within the region still rejected the existence of Israel. Active guerrilla campaigns by Palestinians originating out of Lebanon, Syria, and Jordan exacerbated animosity, leading to retaliations from Israeli forces. Due to the growing number of border conflicts, United Nations forces were stationed in the Sinai Peninsula. Despite their presence, Egypt and Syria entered into a mutual defense agreement in response to Israeli military operations. Suspicious of Israeli operations and intentions, Egypt and Syria began relying on Soviet intelligence to keep informed. By relying on outside intelligence sources, both nations inadvertently set in motion a key event that would eventually lead to

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