Analysis Of The Jungle And Food, Inc.

Superior Essays
Throughout human history, there have always been people who step up to make a change in our world. When people encounter something they don’t like they want to change it. The author of The Jungle and the producers of Food, Inc. are no exception. Both The Jungle and Food, Inc. set out to reveal the food industry and they have changed the what people know ever since.
Upton Sinclair wrote The Jungle in 1906 with a clear purpose, to expose the American meatpacking industry and the lives or immigrants living in the U.S. He wanted people to know what was really going on behind the scenes and the grisly conditions the workers worked in. Sinclair interviewed various people to get the inside story of the industry and he even went undercover as a worker
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developed their purpose of exposing the food industry to Americans in many ways throughout the movie. Right away in chapter one of the movie it’s told that the food industry isn’t about farmers working on farms anymore its factories that produce our food. There are only a few companies that control every aspect of the production of our food and they give no say to our farmers. In fact, today the top four beef packing companies control more than 80% of the market. This shows Americans how centralized the power of the food companies is and how deceiving our food is. For example, we may not eat fast food burgers, but the burgers that we buy from the grocery store are most likely coming from the same company. Another important point of information is made is chapter 1 about the treatment of animals. When the producers of Food, Inc. asked if they could see the inside of the chicken houses they were refused by all of who they asked except for one. The one that allowed them to see the inside of the house was still raising her chickens the old-fashioned way with screen windows so the chickens could see the light. But the conditions in the house were still horrible and the chickens were extremely overcrowded. This shows that if no farmers want people to see their chicken houses, they must be in unspeakable condition. Those chickens never see the light of day their whole lives and suffer because they gain weight so fast they are pretty much sedentary. The reason the farmers have these houses the way they are is because the companies like Tyson force the farmers to raise the chickens a certain way and the farmers are powerless against them to do anything different. In chapter 2 of Food, Inc. another important point is made. Almost all of the processed foods we eat are just clever rearrangements of corn. Corn is in almost everything we eat and use in our everyday lives for the main reason that it 's cheap to grow and we grow so much of it. In fact,

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