Analysis Of Sigmund Freud's Psychodynamic Theory

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Sigmund Freud was an influential psychiatrist and clinical psychologist. He developed the psychoanalytic/ dynamic perspective. This theory states that personality is shaped by thoughts and actions towards unconscious motives and conflicts. These unconscious motives and conflicts, Freud believed, were largely made up of unacceptable feelings and thoughts.
The parts of the psychoanalytic theory include the unconscious mind, the psycho sexual stages, and defense mechanisms. Freud viewed the mind’s structure (and thus, the personality) to be composed of the “superego”, “ego”, and the “id”. These were internalized and unconscious attributes of our mind. The superego is the part of the personality that represents an internalized set of ideals and provides standards for judgement and future aspirations. The superego is more easily known as, “The conscience” or, “The angel on one’s shoulder”. The id is a reservoir for unconscious psychic energy that strives to satisfy basic sexual and aggressive desires. This pleasure
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because it allows the afflicted to do free association. Free association is when patients essentially talk to themselves and attempt to make connections within their own life with the help of a therapist. This is particularly effective with treating D.I.D. because it can allow the patient to discover their multiple identities on their own.
Modern research heavily encourages treating D.I.D. as a form of PTSD. Patients with D.I.D. show heightened brain activity in areas of the brain associated with managing and inhibiting traumatic memories. Society tends to sway away from Freud’s belief that D.I.D. occurs out of repressed desires gone wrong, but more that D.I.D. develops out of situations that were traumatic to a person’s psyche. Freud’s theories have been thoroughly disproven as well, many tend to disagree with his ideas on the basis that he seeked to find a sexual cause to every person’s

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