Analysis Of Kevin Rudd's Speech

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On 13 February 2008, the Australian Prime Minister Kevin Rudd, delivered his apology to the Stolen Generations on behalf of the parliament. This is considered as an important point in current Australian history as it revise the past which would influence the relations between Australian groups in present and future. (Nobles, 2008).In order to understand how he tried to create an imagined community in his speech, I will analyse the apology on two faces: rhetoric and content. Firstly, I will point out how the use of words help him to create image of nation and the language he used to create such a feeling of belonging to Australia. Then, I will examine the main ideas which he use to promote national unity by unifying Indigenous and Non-Indigenous …show more content…
In terms of rhetoric, I will analyse the way he choose to use words and the language of the speech. The language used in the speech is formal to suit the occasion and serve for the purpose of the apology. To highlight the content, the language must to appropriate to serve this ends. To arouse the feeling of belonging, he intentionally repeat many words. Rudd attempted to construct an imagined community by using words like nation, country, Australians. These are words used repeatedly in his speech. This is important to create a sense of belonging to the nation, as a person in that nation. Throughout his speech, he used words like ‘our nation’, the nation’s history, all Australians, great country. Indigenous Australians, and so on. Australians, Call indigenous fellow Australians, Great country Australia, Nation, Great country, All citizen, all Australian, Nation parliament, Our nation, Australian community, Aussie belief, This nation, Indigenous Australians It is constructed by intentionally use of words to emphasizes In his speech, I found the intensively use of words. In addition, the effect of language device to deliver message in a suffient way. The use of these words have the effect of create a feeling of belonging to the nation. Also of note, he called the stolen indigenous people and fellow Australians, as acknowledge them as the people of the nation. Two words ‘nation’ and ‘country’ …show more content…
Use language
These are interlinked to bring about the wanted effect, to touch the heart of the listeners. National history, unity and identity. The imagined community is Australia a nation which combine all the people despite of their races, linking the history of the indigenous to the Australian history, reconciliation, express core value as egalitarian. The history of the in community also the history of the whole Adnoledge this country has one of the most ancient culture in the world, and they are honored by that A nation has its relation to the ancient time, honor the original people and respect for the ancient culture. The Prime Minister succeeded in sign a message to all the population, along with evoke a feeling of

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