Groundwork Of The Metaphysics Of Morals By Immanuel Kant

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In “Groundwork of the Metaphysics of Morals” Immanuel Kant explores pure good will concepts as they relate to moral experiences. However I will only be using section I of Kant’s paper as it relates to duty and good will. I will be examining Kant’s argument of “conformity with duty” as it relates to pure goodwill.
Kant argues that people believe that they are bound by the categorical imperative, which is an unconditional moral obligation that is not dependent on a person's purpose. That is, ordinary common sense comprises a commitment to the categorical imperative. This is Kant’s ultimate principle of morality. However, Kant does not believe his principle of morality illustrates that humans are bound by his categorical imperative.
Kant's
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Kant states that duty is purely good will. This begs the question, does pure good will conform to duty? Conformity with duty but not from good will illustrates the doubt of goodwill. Proving that duties do not always come from good will. Kant supports this by comparing motivation through duty with other motives, particularly with the motive of self-gain. Instead an understanding about an underlying benefit that leads to an act of duty. Kant gives the example of a salesman keeping prices low so that even the poor can buy goods. Then states that the only real reason a merchant would keep prices low is for “purpose of self- interest” (Kant 349). The merchant had to conform to his duty. Although the merchants pure, good will, duty was to have lower prices to benefit his costumers he did so not out of pure good will but put of the realization of …show more content…
If a politician runs for office saying that he is doing it for the good of the community it may seem that the politician only has the community’s best interest at heart. Even if it is clear that the politician is not corrupt, is his campaigns only goal truly to help the community. If this is true, then shouldn’t the politician not be able to gain anything for himself? Such as a salary, strong connections, and fame. Although voters heard the politician saying the only reason he/she ran was the sense of duty to help the community that does not mean the politician ran out of pure good will. Instead the politician could run from duty however with the clear benefit of reward he conformed and therefore did not do it from pure good will. However by serving the community the politician is following through on his duty however he did so through

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