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44 Cards in this Set

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The sum total of a person's thoughts and feelings that defines the self as an object
self-concept
A cognitive structure that represents how you think about yourself in a particular domain and how you organize your experiences in that domain.
self-shema
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self-presentation
the habitual tendency to engage in self-awareness
self-consciousness
A psychological state in which one takes oneself as an object of attention.
self awareness
The ways in which people control and direct their own actions.
self regulation
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public awareness
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private awareness
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evaluation apprehension
the process of seeking our and interpreting situations so as to confirm one's self-concept
self-verification
The process of seeking out and interpreting situations so as to attain a potsitive view of oneself
self-enhancement
The tendency to use cues from other people's self-presentations in controlling one's own self-presentation
self-monitoring
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social perception
Actions that people take to sabotage their performance and enhance their opportunitity to excuse anticipated failure
self handicapping
Communicating feelings and intentions without words
nonverbal behavior
What implications does each of the preceding terms relevant to "self" have to do with how we view ourselves?
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How does each "self" term relate to the other "self" terms?
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According to Mead, from where did the self-concept emerge?
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How do the theories of Mead and James differ?
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Know the functions served by "me" and "I."
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What are the negative aspects of constant self attention?
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How does self-enhancement relate to academic achievement?
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How does self-awareness relate to academic achievement?
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How does delay of gratification relate to academic achievement?
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How does ethnic identification relate to academic achievement?
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Understand the strength model of self-regulatin , and how it would predict efforts for change in which you might engage.
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What are the differences between self-schematics and self-aschematics?
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To what does an independent self-concept relate?
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If self-esteem is disregarded, what do most individuals tend to seek in terms of the "self"
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What triggers social reflection versus social comparison?
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How could self-promotion occur in an everyday situation?
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How could supplication occur in an everyday situation?
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How could ingratiation occur in an everyday situation?
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How could intimidation occur in an everyday situation?
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How could sandbagging occur in an everyday situation?
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How could exemplification occur in an everyday situation?
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If a person has high self esteem, how would he or she respond to criticism?
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If a person has very low self esteem, why would he or she engage in sandbagging?
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How would social role theory explain gender differences?
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What has to be present in order for the primacy effect and the recency effect to occur?
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What is the difference between negativity bias and positivity bias?
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What is fundamental attribution error?
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If there is a problem, what type of attribution is made to others who suffer the problem versus yourself if you suffer the problem? How does the actor-observer effect connect to the preceding question?
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Assume that a politician wants to deceive the public, how would the least truthful information be transmitted?
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