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10 Cards in this Set

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Musica Enchiriadis
The first preserved reference to polyphony written sometime in the middle of the 9th century by unknown author(s). Its more of an instructional manual with examples of organum.
Organum
A polyphonic work, consisting of an original plainchant melody in one voice along with at least one additional voice. The origin of the word organum is unclear. Organum can be found in the Musica Enchiriadis.
Parallel Organum
Organum that can be found in the Musica Enchiriadis; instance of organum where an additional voice runs parallel to an established plainchant melody at a constant level. The Vox Principalis of the chant is the plainchant voice, and the Vox Organalis is the additional voice.
Vox organalis
The organal, added voice in an organum. It started as the fixed voice that ran in parallel motion below the vox principalis. After the Ad Organum faciendum, the vox organalis began to run above.
Vox principalis
The principal voice of the organum. The vox principalis was the established plainchant. It was originally written above the Organalis, but after the Ad Organum Faciendum, was moved underneath.
Ad organum faciendum
A treatise created around 1100. A sylistic innovation in Organum, setting the standard for the Organalis to be written above the Principalis. At the same time, contrary parallel motion between the two lines became commonplace.
St. Martial Polyphony
The organum that was written from the abbey of St. Martial, located in Northern Spain and Southerwestern France, also known as Melismatic Organum. Written with multiple notes of Organum over single notes of the Principalis.
Melismatic Organum
The organum that was written from the abbey of St. Martial, located in Northern Spain and Southerwestern France, also known as St. Martial Polyphony. Written with multiple notes of Organum over single notes of the Principalis, occuring around the beginning of the 12th century.
Tenor
Created from the latin word tenere, which means to hold. Tenor was created in the era of Melismatic Organum, and was the new name for the lower voiced Vox Principalis. This held for a few centuries, until the 15th.
Duplum
The term for the added second voice in organum. Duplum became recognized during the height of Melismatic Organum, becoming the new name for the Vox Organum. This polyphony would be known as Duplum from now on.