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21 Cards in this Set

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  • Back
This change seen in what conditions (5)?
spherocytes

Seen in:
Warm AIHA
Old blood
Burns
Venoms
Oxidant damage
Seen in what conditions? (2)
Eliptocytes

Conditions:
Hereditary ellipotcytosis
Iron deficiency
Seen in what conditions? (4)
Echinocytes

Conditions:
ARF
prolonged EDTA
Low pH slides
Pyruvate kinase deficiency, post splenectomy
Seen in what conditions? (6)
Acanthocytes

Conditions:
Liver failure
a-beta-liproporteinemia
hypothyroid
post-splenectomy
McLeod (no Kx)
MDS
Seen in what conditions? (4)
Target cells

Conditions:
Liver failure
Hemoglobinopathies
Asplenia
Iron deficiency
What condition? (1)
Bite cells

Condition:
G6PD deficiency (munching of Heinz body), may be accompanied by blister cells
Causes? (7)
Basophilic stippling (ribosomal RNA)

Causes:
Lead poisoning
Hemoglobinopathy
Pyrimidine 5' nucleotidase deficiency
MDS
Infection
Sideroblastic anemia
Porphyria
causes? (3)
Howell Jolly body (nuclear remnant)

Causes:
Post-splenectomy/asplenia
Megaloblastic anemia
MDS
Causes (2)?
Pappenheimer body (mitochondrial remnants)

Causes:
post-splenectomy/asplenia
Fe overload
Causes (2)?
Cabot ring: microtubule, remnants of the mitotic spindle

Causes:
Disordered erythropoiesis
Severe megalobastic anemia
Crystal violet stain. What condition?
Heinz body

Conditions:
G6PD deficiency
Iron deficiency anemia, post transfusion. The cells are pale with an enlarged central pallor, in sharp contrast to the transfused normochromic cells.
Blood film, megaloblastic anemia. Macrocytosis and a circulating megaloblast with abnormal, binucleated nucleus and open chromatin.
Sickle cell preparation, in sodium metabisulfate; sickle cell anemia. Even in sickle cell trait, all cells eventually sickle.
Blood film, sickle cell anemia. The erythrocytes are far from one another, suggesting a severe anemia. Numerous pointed sickle cells and target cells are present. Close to the nucleated red blood cell, elliptical cells are seen. These cells have a dense center, instead of the usual central pallor, suggesting that they are incipient sickle cells (500?).
Hemoglobin (Hb) C disease, after splenectomy. Before splenectomy, the only morphologic abnormality was the presence of target cells. After splenectomy, Howell-Jolly bodies and Hb crystals, such as those in the center, were present. Note that almost all of the Hb in this particular cell is in the dark bar, and the membrane is still visible. Some such crystals are distinctly hexagonal (1000?).
Homozygous β-thalassemia. A few cells contain hardly any hemoglobin (Hb), and the Hb is often precipitated at the membrane. Bizarre target cells, Howell-Jolly bodies, and poorly hemoglobinized nucleated red blood cells are seen.
β-Thalassemia trait. Hypochromic, microcytic red blood cells with frequent targeting. Mild anemia.
Hemoglobin H disease. Mild anemia and target cells.
Hemoglobin H preparation. Film made after incubation of blood with brilliant cresyl blue. Several red cells contain multiple small pale blue inclusions.
Heinz bodies. Normal red cells incubated with an oxidant drug and stained while in suspension with methyl violet; finally, an air-dried film was made and stained with Wright's stain. Purple-staining Heinz bodies are precipitates of denatured hemoglobin that tend to attach to the cell membrane.