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23 Cards in this Set

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Overview (Ref a, b, c)
The Naval Air Training and Operating Procedures Standardization (NATOPS)
Program is a positive approach toward improving combat readiness and achieving a substantial reduction in the aircraft mishap rate. Standardization, based on professional knowledge and experience, provides the basis for development of an efficient and sound operational
NATOPS History (Ref a, b, c)
NATOPS was established by the Unlted States Navy in
1961 as a positive approach
towards improving combat readiness and achieving a substantial reduction in naval
aircraft mishaps. In 1950 the US Navy/Marine Corps lost 776 aircraft (roughly 2
airplanes per day or a rate of 54 major mishaps per 10,000 flight hours). Numerous technical initiatives, including the angled flight deck in 1954, and standardization programs, were credited with significantly reducing the rate to 19 major mishaps per 10,000 flight hours by 1961, and further to 9 by 1970 (the current rate, for comparison, is under 2 major mishaps per 10,000 flight hours).
In 1950 the US Navy/Marine Corps lost
776 aircraft (roughly 2
airplanes per day or a rate of 54 major mishaps per 10,000 flight hours).
Numerous technical initiatives, including the angled flight deck in 1954, and
standardization programs, were credited with significantly reducing the rate to
19 major mishaps per 10,000 flight hours by 1961, and further to 9 by 1970 (the
current rate, for comparison, is under 2 major mishaps per 10,000 flight hours).
A lack of standardization and training in both maintenance and flight operatlons was cited as causal in a large percentage of mishaps. Several standardization programs were initiated in the late 50's and early 60's to counter this problem. The first was the
Naval Aviation Maintenance Program (NAMP) in 1959. Prior to the NAMP, aircraft maintenance practices were completely non-standardized.
The second standardization initiative began in 1961
with the introduction of the
Fleet Replacement Squadron (FRS) program. FRSs
indoctrinate newly designated aircrew and aircraft mechanics into the
peculiarities of specific aircraft. Prior to the FRS concept, qualified pilots
transitioning to a new aircraft were essentially told how to start it, and then
sent to go fly. The final major standardization program put in place was NATOPS
NATOPS is a manual designed to
standardize procedures for operating an
aircraft we use it for events where the operation of a system or the aircraft is
needed. One of the most dangerous times for maintenance and personnel is during engine start, operation, and shutdown.
Before starting an engine
the wheels of the aircraft shall be chocked and
the parking brake set unless a deviation from this requirement is specifically authorized by the applicable model NATOPS manual.
Where applicable, intake screens shall be
installed on jet aircraft
Prior to starting jet engines, intakes and surrounding ground/deck
shall be inspected to eliminate the possibility of Foreign Object Damage (FOD).
When an engine is started by non-pilot personnel for testing and warm-up purposes on aircraft other than transport and patrol class equipped with parking brakes,
the plane shall be tied down.
Whenever an engine is started
personnel with adequate fire extinguishing equipment, if available, shall be stationed in the immediate vicinity of the engine but safely clear of intakes or propellers.
Standardization also included the terms and phrases we use in naval aviation
speech and literature, the following is a brief list of meaning for terms used in
the NATOPS Manual:
Warning.
An operating procedure, practice, or condition, etc., that may result in injury or death if not carefully observed or followed.
Caution.
An operating procedure, practice, or condition, etc., that may result in damage to equipment if not carefully observed or followed.
Note.
An operating procedure, practice, or condition, etc., that must be emphasized.
Shall.
means a procedure that is mandatory.
Should.
Means a procedure that is recommended.
May
"May" and "need not" mean the procedure is optional.
Will. Indicates futurity and never indicates any degree of requirement for
application of a procedure.
The visual identification system for naval aircraft provides for the
assignment
of aircraft markings and side numbers that identify aircraft of one unit from those of another using unit identification assigned by the CNO.
The system
provides a means of rapid identification of Navy and marine aircraft that is
simple, flexible and readily adaptable to expansion in the event of mobilization.
The vertical stabilizer of the aircraft is where the below marking will be
located.
COMNAVAIRLANT.
The first character shall be "A through M"; second character
"A through Z".
COMNAVAIRPAC.
The first character· shall be "N through Z"; second character
"A through Z".
CNATRA.
The first character shall be "A through G"; there is no second
character.