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5 Cards in this Set

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What are Ionic Bonds?
Mutual Attraction of opposite charged ions. Electrons are transferred from one atom to another. Ionic compounds such as salts are most commonly found in the ionic form because water is polar and they get pulled apart to the slightly polar water molecules which they are attracted to.
What are Covalent Bonds?
1 or more pairs of electrons are shared between two atoms. Carbon= most common cov. bond
What are Polar Covalent Bonds?
Shared electrons are attracted by the nucleus of one atom, then the nucleus of the other atom. The electrons spend more time around the more strongly attracting nucleus. Water is the most common polar covalent bond. If the electronegativities are different, then it is a polar covalent bond.
What are single bonds?
Single bonds are flexible (allow for rotation of the atoms. Example: Fats [lipids that are solid at room temperature (tallow, lard, butter, etc.), from animals]. If it is made from single bonds then it is saturated. Fats are more healthy then oils.
What are double, triple bonds?
Double (or more) bonds are rigid, there is no rotation of the atoms. Example: Oils (Not solid at room temp. b/c they have double bonds so they can't be packed together- fats are solid b/c they have single bonds so they can be packed together)