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64 Cards in this Set

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a tall, plain-spoken Illinois lawyer who was elected in 1860 as the President of the United States after one of the strangest elections in the nation's history.
Abraham Lincoln (20)
a law established by Congress outlining the steps leading to statehood and also banned slavery north of the Ohio River.
Northwest Ordinance of 1787 (20)
as a result of the passing of the Northwest Ordinance of 1787, this one of three western states that were formed north of the Ohio River became free states.
Ohio (20)
as a result of the passing of the Northwest Ordinance of 1787, this one of three western states that were formed north of the Ohio River became free states.
Illinois (20)
as a result of the passing of the Northwest Ordinance of 1787, this one of three western states that were formed north of the Ohio River became free states.
Indiana (20)
as a result of the passing of the Northwest Ordinance of 1787, this one of four states that were formed south of the Ohio River permitted slavery.
Kentucky (20)
as a result of the passing of the Northwest Ordinance of 1787, this one of four states that were formed south of the Ohio River permitted slavery.
Tennessee (20)
as a result of the passing of the Northwest Ordinance of 1787, this one of four states that were formed south of the Ohio River permitted slavery.
Louisiana (20)
as a result of the passing of the Northwest Ordinance of 1787, this one of four states that were formed south of the Ohio River permitted slavery.
Mississippi (20)
one of two territories which applied to Congress for statehood in 1819, no one questioned it to be a slave state because it was located far south of the Ohio River and was surrounded by other slave states.
Alabama (20)
one of two territories which applied to Congress for statehood in 1819 and created a controversy on becoming a slave or free state.
Missouri (20)
the United States as one country, united under a single government.
the Union (20)
the Congressional representative from New York who in 1819 proposed an amendment to the Missouri statehood bill that it could join the Union but only as a free state.
James Tallmadge (20)
the Congressional representative from New Hampshire who in 1819 argued in favor of the Tallmadge amendment saying: ". . . if we suffer [allow] it to pass . . let us at least be consistent, and declare that our Constitution was made to impose slavery, and not to establish liberty."
Arthur Livermore (20)
a proposed amendment to the statehood bill of Missouri outlining that it could join the Union, but only as a free state.
Tallmadge Amendment (20)
in 1820, this territory asked to enter the Union as free state, further complicating the question of Missouri statehood.
Maine (20)
the act of withdrawing from an organization or alliance such as the withdrawal of the southern states from the Union.
"secession" (20)
the war between the states.
Civil War (20)
as a result, Missouri entered the Union as a slave state while Maine entered as a free state and a line was drawn at the 36 30' parallel as the demarcation for slavery.
Missouri Compromise (20)
the Congressional representative from Kentucky who crafted the Missouri Compromise admitting Missouri to the Union as a slave state and Maine as a free state.
Henry Clay (20)
the contested territory of the Missouri Compromise where southern slaveholders deeply resented the ban on slavery.
Louisiana Territory (20)
the Secretary of State during the time of the Missouri Compromise who recognized that it had not settled the future of slavery in the United States as a whole.
John Quincy Adams (20)
in the 1820s, the leaders of this movement promised that God would grant salvation to those who dedicated their lives to the Lord's work and for some, that work was the abolition of slavery.
Second Great Awakening (20)
to set something aside indefinitely which meant that Congress would neither read nor act upon the petition.
to table (20)
he was the leader with six other fellow slaves of a slave rebellion in 1831.
Nat Turner (20)
a person who flees or tries to escape (for example, from slavery).
fugitives (20)
to silence someone from petitioning or action; in this case keeping the slavery issue out of the Congress which lasted for ten years.
"Gag Rule" (20)
the U.S. President who, in 1846, sent a bill to Congress asking for funds for the war with Mexico.
James K. Polk (20)
a Congressional representative from Pennsylvania who in 1846 added an amendment to President Polk's bill stating that "neither slavery nor involuntary servitude shall ever exist" in any part of the territory that might be acquired from Mexico.
David Wilmot (20)
the condition added to President Polk's bill that "neither slavery nor involuntary servitude shall ever exist" in any part of the territory that might be acquired from Mexico.
Wilmot Proviso (20)
the huge region taken by the United States from Mexico.
Mexican Cession (20)
the territory applied for admission to the union as free state in 1849 but was blocked by the Southern states because it would upset the equal balance between slave and free states.
California (20)
the U.S. senator from Massachusetts who lent his support to Senator Henry Clay of Kentucky for the Compromise of 1850.
Daniel Webster (20)
this plan, from the creator of the Missouri Compromise, admitted California as a free state and allowed the Southwestern territories to be set up with no restrictions on slavery.
Compromise of 1850 (20)
Senator Henry Clay's plan to make it easier to find and reclaim slaveholders' runaway slaves.
Fugitive Slave Law (20)
many runaway slave fled to this neighboring country in the North rather than risk being caught and sent back to their masters.
Canada (20)
a former slave who became a preacher living in New York who disagreed with the Fugitive Slave Law saying, "I don't respect this law - I don't fear it - I won't obey it . . . I will not live like a slave, and if force is employed to reenslave me, I shall make preparations to meet the crisis as becomes a man."
Rev. Jarmain Loguen (20)
a New England poet and abolitionist who complained about the Fugitive Slave Law saying that this will make "slave catchers of us all."
Ralph Waldo Emerson (20)
upon meeting this abolitionist and writer of Uncle Tom's Cabin, Abraham Lincoln said, "so you're the little woman who wrote the book that made this great war (referring to the Civil War)."
Harriet Beecher Stowe (20)
an old, saintly slave who was whipped to death by his cruel master, Simon Legree, in Harriet Beecher Stowe's novel.
Uncle Tom (20)
the cruel master who whipped to death the old, saintly slave known as Uncle Tom in Harriet Beecher Stowe's novel.
Simon Legree (20)
in the South, this novel and its author Harriet Beecher Stowe were scorned and cursed; in the North it turned millions of people against slavery - no other work of literature had ever aroused such powerful emotions about slavery.
Uncle Tom's Cabin (20)
in the novel Uncle Tom's Cabin, he was the kind slaveholder who, unable to pay his debts, was forced to sell Uncle Tom away from his family.
Colonel Shelby (20)
in the novel Uncle Tom's cabin, she was the beautiful slave mother who chose to risk death rather than be sold away from her young son.
Eliza (20)
the senator from Illinois who in 1854 introduced a bill in Congress organized the Great Plains into the Nebraska Territory and opened it to settlers.
Stephen A. Douglas (20)
the territory Sen. Stephen Douglas of Illinois tried to organize and open to settlers but became a very controversial issue involving slavery.
Nebraska Territory (20)
Sen. Stephen Douglas's final bill which created two new territories and also scrapped the Missouri Compromise by leaving it up to the settlers themselves to decide what to do about slavery in the two territories.
Kansas-Nebraska Act (20)
the newspaper editor of the New York Tribune who charged that, "the pretense of Douglas and Co. that not even Kansas is to be made a slave state by his bill is a gag [joke]."
Horace Greeley (20)
the home of the anti-slavery movement in Kansas, pro-slavery settlers and "border ruffians" from Missouri invaded it and burned a hotel, looted several homes, and tossed the presses of two abolitionist newspapers into the Kaw River.
Lawrence, Kansas (20)
the anti-slavery settlers who settled in the new territories.
"free soilers" (20)
a fiery abolitionist who, with his seven followers including four of his sons and sons-in-law, invaded the pro-slavery town of Pottawatomie where they dragged five men they suspected of supporting slavery from their homes and hacked them to death.
John Brown (20)
a pro-slavery town where John Brown with his seven followers dragged five men they suspected of supporting slavery from their homes and hacked them to death with swords.
Pottawatomie (20)
the senator from Massachusetts who in 1856 voiced his suspicions on the violence in Lawrence, Kansas in a passionate speech entitled "The Crime Against Kansas."
Charles Sumner (20)
the distinguished senator from South Carolina whom Senator Charles Sumner of Massachusetts heaped abuse on in his passionate speech entitled "The Crime Against Kansas."
Andrew P. Butler (20)
the New England poet who congratulated Senator Charles Sumner Massachusetts on his passionate speech entitled "The Crime Against Kansas."
Henry Wadsworth Longfellow (20)
South Carolina representative and nephew of the distinguished senator from South Carolina Andrew P. Butler who attacked Senator Charles Sumner of Massachusetts in the Senate, beating him with his cane until it broke in half.
Preston Brooks (20)
a Missouri slave who had traveled with his owner to Wisconsin where slavery was banned by the Missouri Compromise; upon his return to Missouri, he went to court to win his freedom, arguing that his stay in Wisconsin had made him a free man.
Dred Scott (20)
the Chief Justice of the Supreme Court in 1857 who handed the Dred Scott decision.
Roger Taney (20)
a series of debates between the two senatorial candidates from Illinois on the issue of slavery.
Lincoln-Douglas Debates (20)
the federal arsenal in Virginia where John Brown and his men seized to use the weapons to arm slaves for a rebellion that would destroy slavery forever.
Harpers Ferry (20)
one of two Democratic nominees from the Kentucky in the 1860 presidential race.
John C. Breckinridge (20)
a Tennesseean, he made the 1860 presidential race more confusing when a group called the Constitutional Union Party nominated him
John Bell (20)
the city where delegates attending a state convention in 1861 voted to leave the Union.
Charleston, South Carolina (20)
a federal fort in Charleston harbor, South Carolina where on April 12, 1861, people opened fire ushering the beginning of the Civil War.
Fort Sumter (20)