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58 Cards in this Set

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  • Back
guidelines for how a country handles political and economic interactions with other countries.
foreign policy (12)
the symbols the Founders of the United States used to show their hopes and dreams for the country.
Great Seal of the United States (12)
part of the Great Seal of the United States that signifies strength and endurance.
unfinished pyramids (12)
part of the Great Seal of the United States which symbolizes national power.
bald eagle (12)
in one talon of the bald eagle it grasps something that stands for war.
arrows (12)
in another talon of the bald eagle it grasps something that stands for peace.
olive branch (12)
this region which belonged to the United States after the Revolutionary War still had forts that the British refused to abandon.
Ohio Valley (12)
agreements made with other nations to aid and support each other.
alliances (12)
a policy of not choosing sides in a war or dispute between other countries.
neutrality (12)
a policy of avoiding political or military agreements with other countries; first established by George Washington.
isolationism (12)
the Chief Justice of the Supreme Court under George Washington who was sent to London to establish a treaty with the British on the withdrawal of troops in the Ohio Valley.
John Jay (12)
the treaty that the British will finally agree to pull their troops from the Ohio Valley.
Jay Treaty (12)
the French Foreign Minister who refused to receive three American envoys or representatives to talk about ending French attacks on American merchant ships bound for Britain.
Talleyrand (12)
a payment of money as the price of protection.
tribute (12)
when three American envoys were sent to France to end the attacks of American merchant ships bound for Britain by the French navy, they were met by secret agents who claimed that no peace talks would be held unless the French Foreign Minister Talleyrand receive a large sum of money as a tribute.
XYZ Affair (12)
privately owned ships.
privateers (12)
the French general who had taken over the French government who was eager to make peace with both Britain and the United States and ordered an end to the seizure of American ships and the release of captured American sailors.
Napoleon Bonaparte (12)
the act of kidnapping American sailors to serve in the British navy.
impressment (12)
the British warship which, in 1807, fired at the American warship the Chesapeake, when the captain refused to allow a search of the ship.
the Leopard (12)
the American warship which, in 1807, was fired upon by the British warship the Leopard which killed and wounded 21 American sailors, when the captain refused to allow a search of the ship.
the Chesapeake (12)
the collective name for the pirates from Morocco, Algiers, Tunis, and Tripoli who had preyed on merchant ships entering the Mediterranean Sea, seizing the ships and holding their crews for ransom.
Barbary States of North Africa (12)
one of four Barbary states of North Africa which had preyed on merchant ships entering the Mediterranean Sea, seizing the ships and holding their crews for ransom.
Algiers (12)
one of four Barbary states of North Africa which had preyed on merchant ships entering the Mediterranean Sea, seizing the ships and holding their crews for ransom.
Tunis (12)
one of four Barbary states of North Africa which had preyed on merchant ships entering the Mediterranean Sea, seizing the ships and holding their crews for ransom.
Tripoli (12)
one of four Barbary states of North Africa which had preyed on merchant ships entering the Mediterranean Sea, seizing the ships and holding their crews for ransom.
Morocco (12)
one of the American ships sent to Tripoli which ran aground on a hidden reef in the harbor, and as a result, the captain and crew were captured and held for ransom.
the Philadelphia (12)
a young American naval officer of the Philadelphia who led a raiding party into the heavily guarded Tripoli harbor and set the ship on fire.
Stephen Decatur (12)
a government order that stops merchant ships from leaving or entering a country's ports.
embargo (12)
under this law proposed by President Thomas Jefferson, no foreign ships could enter U.S. ports, and no American ships could leave, except to trade at other U.S. ports.
Embargo Act of 1807 (12)
the name used in the New England newspapers for the Embargo Act of 1807 when it backfired causing 55,000 seamen to lose their jobs while their ships rotted at deserted docks.
"Dambargo" (12)
the popular name used by people who were opposed to the Embargo Act of 1807 because it made sense to all who were feeling the pinch.
"O-grab-me" (12)
ships stopping other ships from entering and exiting the harbor.
blockade (12)
the Indiana governor who organized an army of militia troops and marched to Prophetstown on Tippecanoe Creek rather than wait for the Shawnee Indians to attack.
William Harrison (12)
the Native Americans who settled into the Ohio and Mississippi River valleys and was pushed away when white settlers began moving into those regions.
Shawnee Indians (12)
one of two Shawnee Indian chiefs who united Native Americans in an attempt to halt the advance of white settlers onto Indian lands.
Tecumseh (12)
a Shawnee Indian chief and brother of Tecumseh, he decided that the only way to stop the white settlers moving into the Ohio and Mississippi River valleys was to unite the Native Americans in the region into one great Indian nation.
the Prophet (12)
the place where Tecumseh built the center for his Indian nation on Tippecanoe Creek in Indiana Territory.
Prophetstown (12)
the location in Indiana Territory where Tecumseh built Prophetstown to be a center of his Indian nation.
Tippecanoe Creek (12)
a "war hawk" from Kentucky eager for war who argued that driving the British out of Canada would help to end the Indian threat because they found that the British military forces there were providing weapons to Chief Tecumseh.
Henry Clay (12)
a "war hawk" from South Carolina eager for war who argued that driving the British out of Canada would help to end the Indian threat because they found that the British military forces there were providing weapons to Chief Tecumseh.
John C. Calhoun (12)
Congressmen including Henry Clay of Kentucky and John C. Calhoun of South Carolina who were so eager for war because they argued that driving the British out of Canada would help to end the Indian threat, and once the British were gone, Canada could be added to the United States.
"war hawks" (12)
on returning in 1814 to the capital after the British invaded Washington, DC and burned the city, she wrote that nothing remained of the President's house "but its cracked and blacken'd wall."
Margaret Bayard Smith (12)
this American military installation guarded the entrance to the port city and harbor of Baltimore.
Fort McHenry (12)
an American lawyer who watched the bombardment of Fort McHenry through the long night and when he saw that the American flag still waved when dawn broke, he captured his feelings in a poem.
Francis Scott Key (12)
a poem written by an American lawyer named Francis Scott Key on the bombardment of Fort McHenry.
"Star Spangled Banner" (12)
the greatest American victory in the War of 1812 which made Andrew Jackson a national hero.
Battle of New Orleans (12)
the hero of the Battle of New Orleans with a rag-tag army of 7,000 militia troops, free African Americans, Indians, and pirates, he led them into victory with some 7,000 British troops killed or wounded compared with only about 20 Americans.
Gen. Andrew Jackson (12)
the war against Britain issued by Congress at the request of President James Madison on July 17, 1812 which was a very bold step for a nation with an army of 7,000 poorly trained men and navy of only 16 ships.
War of 1812 (12)
the strategic city in the mouth of the Mississippi River where the British launched another invasion, but was defended by General Andrew Jackson and a rag-tag army of 7,000 militia troops, free African Americans, Indians, and pirates.
New Orleans (12)
a city in Belgium where American and British diplomats signed a peace treaty ending the War of 1812; although none of the issues that led to the war were not settled, Americans were pleased to have peace.
Treaty of Ghent (12)
the American who became president in 1817 who wanted to return the nation to its policy of isolationism and turn to events happening in Mexico.
James Monroe (12)
a Catholic Mexican priest who inspired an independence movement in Mexico and inspired other revolutions that spread throughout Latin America in the early 1800s.
Manuel Hidalgo (12)
a small Mexican town where a Catholic priest named Manuel Hidalgo spoke in 1810 to a crowd of poor Indians to rebel against Spanish rule.
Dolores (12)
"My children, when will you recover lands stolen from your ancestors three hundred years ago by the hated, Spaniard? Down with bad government! Death to the Spaniards!"
Cry of Dolores (12)
a Venezuelan leader who launched in 1810, a revolution in the north with the cry: "Spaniards! You will receive death at our hands! Americans ! You will receive life!"
Simon Bolivar (12)
a revolutionary from Argentina who led the struggle for independence in South America in the south.
Jose de San Martin (12)
the head of the State Department, who oversees matters relating to foreign countries and who is an important member of the president's cabinet.
Secretary of State (12)
a statement of official government policy especially in foreign affairs that President James Monroe made in Congress stating that the nations of North and South America were "not to be considered subjects to future colonization by any European power" and would view efforts by Europeans to take over "any portion of this hemisphere as dangerous to our people and safety."
Monroe Doctrine (12)