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44 Cards in this Set

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the sixth president of the United States, he was involved in one of the dirtiest presidential campaigns against Andrew Jackson.
John Quincy Adams (14)
the popular hero of the Battle of New Orleans, he was pitted against in the presidential campaign of 1828 against John Quincy Adams, the nation's sixth president, in what was one of the dirtiest in American history.
Andrew Jackson (14)
a practice during political campaigns of hurling reckless accusations at both sides.
mudslinging (14)
the accusation of the Andrew Jackson camp during the presidential campaign of 1828 that John Quincy Adams traveled on Sundays.
"Sabbath-breaker" (14)
the name that Andrew Jackson's troops called him because according to his opponent John Quincy Adams' camp, he was as tough as :the hardest wood in creation."
"Old Hickory" (14)
born to an upper-class, wealthy, respected family.
well-born (14)
otherwise known as the rich, many new voters in 1824 believed that the national government had been taken over by them.
"monied interest" (14)
an eyewitness to Andrew Jackson's inauguration, she described as "an imposing and majestic spectacle," but later on turned into a near riot.
Margaret Bayard Smith (14)
achieving wealth or influence through one's own effort rather than being born to a privileged family.
self-made man (14)
a slave trader who called Jackson "a worthless scoundrel" and insulted his wife, Rachel; he was shot by Jackson in a duel.
Charles Dickinson (14)
the battle where Andrew Jackson became a national hero after defeating the British.
Battle of New Orleans (14)
the Battle of New Orleans was one of the many battles fought by the Americans against the British in this war.
War of 1812 (14)
one of four presidential candidates in 1824 who had come in fourth in the popular elections but urged his supporters in the House to back John Quincy Adams thus securing him the presidency; he then was appointed by Adams as his secretary of State.
Henry Clay (14)
one of four presidential candidates in the 1824 elections who came in third behind Andrew Jackson and John Quincy Adams.
William Crawford (14)
in the 1824 presidential elections, when no candidate has an electoral majority, this house chooses a president from the three leading candidates.
House of Representatives (14)
the political organization formed by the supporters of Andrew Jackson which promised that they would represent ordinary farmers, workers, and the poor in government.
Democratic Party (14)
the nation's first campaign song, supporters of Andrew Jackson sang it at every political meeting in 1828.
"The Hunters of Kentucky" (14)
the idea that was borne out of Andrew Jackson's presidential campaign of 1828 that the common people should control their government.
Jacksonian Democracy (14)
President Andrew Jackson did not rely on his cabinet for advice but made his decisions with the help of trusted friends and political supporters earning this pejorative title from his opponents.
"kitchen cabinet" (14)
a congressman and President Jackson's closest adviser, he was accused of being "the President's lying machine."
Amos Kendall (14)
employees of the government.
civil servants (14)
the practice of rewarding political supporters with government jobs.
spoils system (14)
a tax imposed by the government on goods imported from another country.
tariff (14)
the name Southerners called the 1828 taxes on imported goods such as cloth and glass since it would hurt cotton sales.
Tariff of Abominations (14)
Andrew Jackson's Vice President, this Southerner called on southern states to declare the tariff "null and void" because the law passed favored one group and therefore unconstitutional.
John C. Calhoun (14)
the state having the right, in this case both the 1828 and 1832 tariff laws, to reject the laws.
nullification (14)
this state led by Vice President John C. Calhoun boldly proclaimed its right to nullify both the 1828 and 1832 tariff laws.
South Carolina (14)
to withdraw from an organization or alliance; in this case, to withdraw from the United States.
secede (14)
a private business that has been chartered by Congress since 1794, of which the federal government owned one-fifth of the bank.
Bank of the United States (14)
the president of the Bank of the United States in 1816, the president distrusted him because he was a wealthy, well-born, highly educated, widely traveled, well-mannered lawyer, politician, and banker.
Nicholas Biddle (14)
President Andrew Jackson's enemies called the state banks this name because they were run by the president's supporters.
"pet banks" (14)
one of "Five Civilized Tribes" who lived in the South who had adopted many white ways, given up hunting to become farmers, and learned to read and write.
Creek (14)
one of "Five Civilized Tribes" who lived in the South who had their own written language, a newspaper, and a constitution modeled on the U.S. Constitution.
Cherokee (14)
one of "Five Civilized Tribes" who lived in the South who had adopted many white ways, given up hunting to become farmers, and learned to read and write.
Chickasaw (14)
one of "Five Civilized Tribes" who lived in the South who had adopted many white ways, given up hunting to become farmers, and learned to read and write.
Choctaw (14)
one of "Five Civilized Tribes" who lived in the South who had adopted many white ways, given up hunting to become farmers, and learned to read and write.
Seminole (14)
the Creek, Cherokee, Chickasaw, Choctaw, and Seminole nations who adopted many white ways, given up hunting to become farmers, and learned to read and write.
"Five Civilized Tribes" (14)
the law passed by Congress in 1830 through the encouragement of President Andrew Jackson allowing the president to make treaties in which Native Americans in the east traded their lands for new territory on the Great Plains.
Indian Removal Act (14)
one of two Native American tribes in Illinois who resisted the Indian Removal Act of 1830 and fought the government for two years.
Sac (14)
one of two Native American tribes in Illinois who resisted the Indian Removal Act of 1830 and fought the government for two years.
Fox (14)
the Native American chief who led the Sac and Fox Indians of Illinois to fight against the Indian Removal Act of 1830 for two years.
Black Hawk (14)
a Cherokee Indian who developed an 86-letter alphabet for the Cherokee language.
Sequoyah (14)
more than17,000 Cherokee were dragged from their homes in Georgia and herded west by federal troops; 4,000 died during their long journey walk to Indian territory.
"Trail of Tears" (14)
a young Seminole chief of Florida who resisted their removal into Indian territory for ten years.
Osceola (14)