The Importance Of Nature In Ralph Waldo Emerson's Life

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Waldo Emerson, the “father” of American literature, was very particular in the way that he believed everyone should live. He never believed in conformity, always stressing the idea of a unique personality and lifestyle. The average life of an Emersonian would be secluded, original and filled with wonder. It would be a life completely opposite from the life that is being lived in the 21st century.
Emerson once said, “The great man is he who in the midst of the crowd keeps with perfect sweetness the independence of solitude” (Daniel). To achieve the full Emersonian feeling, picture a secluded cabin in the woods. “To go into solitude, a man needs to retire as much from his chamber as from society” (Nature-1826). The cabin is beautifully and meticulously
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First and foremost, Nature is the almighty. Nature should always be our fist thought with everything that you do, say and think. Nature offers perpetual youth and joy and counteracts whatever misfortune befalls on an individual. “A nobler want of man is served by nature, namely, the love of Beauty” (1829). Emerson claims that nature is the source of all things pure and without it acting as a release for us, we lose appreciation and we, as a society, will eventually all become identical, emotionless robots. To avoid the above situation, it is necessary to abide by the standards set in place by Ralph Waldo …show more content…
You have to be committed and ready for your life to drastically change. The daily life of an Emersonian includes creating a beautiful, serene homestead. You then will build extensive self-trust without conforming to society, you will avoid buying new things unless you absolutely need them, and you will avoid all urges to travel. After these five things are complete, you can truly begin to live as Ralph Waldo Emerson did. However, the question still, and always will remain: If Emerson is so passionate about this way of life, and if he wants people to try it for themselves, how can he too be so passionate about encouraging people to be leaders instead of followers? Isn’t he trying to be the leader and encouraging us to be his

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