The Roots Of Martin Luther And The Protestant Movement

1446 Words 6 Pages
Historically, it is accepted by many, that the Protestant Movement started the instant that Martin Luther nailed his 95 theses to a church door. The roots of Protestantism, however, go far deeper than simply this outrage; with a series of events leading up to the eventual religious split from the Catholic Church. Beginning with the three simultaneously reigning Popes in the early 15th century, many including Luther, felt the Church become more and more corrupt. Arguably, what disgruntled many Catholics more was the sale of indulgences by the Church as a way to repent sins. In addition to the sale of “blessings,” Catholic clergymen also engaged in other types of corrupt activities, including bribery and simony during the Renaissance. Witnessing …show more content…
At the center of Calvinism was the concept of Predestination; in which before birth, one’s fate is determined by God. Likewise, according to predestination, there is nothing that the mortal human can do to secure his fate if it has been chosen that he is to spend eternity in hell. The Catholic Church worried that if people truly believed in Calvinism’s principles, no one would buy indulgences; leading to less money for the Church. However, now that Protestantism had grown and involved monarchs, the Calvinist flame would be very hard to extinguish, if not impossible. “God by his eternal and immutable counsel determined. . . those whom it was his pleasure one day to admit to salvation. . . those whom. . . it was his pleasure to doom to destruction. . .”(Calvin 281). John Calvin’s ability to quickly spread predestination, led the Reformation to advance; even much more so than the Roman Catholic Church ever had in its centuries long …show more content…
In those 11 years between Henry and Elizabeth, was the rule of Edward VI, a Roman Catholic. Now under Queen Elizabeth I, ruling from 1558-1603, Protestantism was once again reinstated in England via the Anglican Church. However, with a majority of England being Protestant, came fear of invasion from nearby Catholic Spain or France. It was also around this point that new branches of the Anglican Church sprang up around the British Isles; splitting initially due to a disagreement in prayer books. One of the first to leave the Church of England were the Puritans who, “. . . wished to purify the Anglican church of what they considered papist survivals in belief, ritual, and church government. . .” (366). Another group to split from the Church were the Presbyterians, who believed in Calvinist predestination. Most removed from the Anglican, or Church of England, were the Congregationalists who, reasonably, gave great power to their congregations as opposed to a Church council. All of these churches are alike in that they stem from the Church of England, and are likewise far removed from the traditions commonplace merely 100 years

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