The Mulatto And Incident In The Life Of A Slave Girl

Superior Essays
Sentimental convention of The Mulatto and Incident in the Life of a Slave Girl Slavery in my eyes is a foundation that has generally been ridiculed on behalf of the physical requests of the practice, being that a few realize those gruesome mental hardships that slaves endured. Victor Sejour and Harriet Jacobs wrote two of the most fascinating slave narratives of the early nineteen century in African American writing. Victor Sejour narrative “The Mulatto” appraises the story of Georges, a slave who grew up not knowing who his father was. Throughout the slave narrative he has his constant battle with himself and finding who he truly is in the mulatto lifestyle. He was also a loyal slave to his master, Mr. Alfred. It was not until the end of …show more content…
She spent years hiding in her grandmother attic while the flint family continues to pursue her. She finally escaped to the north after seven years of bondage. In this essay I will be comparing and contrasting four different themes in the two narratives: These characters are both being mulattos; sexual harassment; fictional and non-fictional aspect of the two narratives.
The first comparison in “The Mulatto” and “Incident in the life of a slave girl” is that they were both mulattos. During the time of slavery in the United States of America. The white slave owners will have sexual relationships with their black female slaves. Therefore the result of that adulterous act usually is a child being born in the plantation. Many slave owners did not care for their mulatto children. According to “The Mulatto”, “Georges grew up without ever hearing the name of his father; and when at times he attempted to penetrate the mystery surrounding his birth his mother remained inflexible never yielding to his entreaties”. In the Harriet Jacobs’ narrative she explains, “My master was, to my knowledge, the father of eleven
…show more content…
One of the first differences between these two narratives is that one is fictional and the other is non-fictional. “The Mulatto” is the first fictionally known slave narrative by an African American slave. In the beginning of this narrative, you may think that all the events of this short narrative are real. In the beginning of the story, when Georges was not allowed to know the name of his father because his father was the master of his mother. Also the sexual harassment of the wife of Georges was very non-fictional. In the time of slavery, the slave owner would rape and sexual harassed black slave women because they were properties to them. As you continue to read the narrative you can see clues of the story being fictional starts to appear. One of them was when Georges informs his master Alfred that he is to be murdered by a band of thieves. And the other was at the end of the story when Georges was about to have his revenge on his master. He first poisoned his wife and left her for death and then axed Alfred in his chamber. As his master head rolled he heard from the world word that he was waiting to hear for a very long time. Alfred was his father, .in the “Incident in the life of a slave girl” Harriet Jacobs wrote a non-fictional narrative that told her story from the time she first found out that she was a slave to her

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