The Influence Of The Universal Declaration Of Human Rights

1131 Words 5 Pages
When the United nations (UN) was written the world was reeling from one of the most horrific wars and acts in all of human history. There was almost an unspoken world consensus that what had happened should not be repeated, so the UN was created to attempt to maintain peace and humanity within the world. The crowning jewel of course being the Universal Declaration of Humans Rights, however, it causes some debate. The Universal Declaration of Human Rights state that human beings are born with “equal and inalienable rights”, which seems to most to be common sense and a rather important realization, but as past and present has shown us, the strength and enforcement, or lack thereof, has called into the question the effectiveness of said document. …show more content…
This heavy hand is made obvious by the clearly American ideals in the document, such as the idea of “equal and inalienable rights” which comes directly from the Declaration of Independence. When this document was written of course this only pertain to the white, land-holding man, but the message was greater. It was a statement against the honor-based systems of old that people were done being violated. That as human beings they had a certain level of dignity and they wanted it recognized. It was revolutionary, for a lack of a better word, and it changed the world. It was like the first domino was knocked down because other countries soon followed suit such as France. People believed that they were greater than what society said they were, and that they had this equal opportunity because as human beings we are all born with the same liberties and …show more content…
Well, the answer is the greatest issue with Universal Declaration of Human Rights. If a member nation violates one or all of the articles, the penalty is nothing. The consensus, it seems, is that because you are a part of the United Nations, you will follow the guidelines and that is enough. However, almost every nation has violated one of the articles. So then what is the point? Well, some could argue that they are only little violations, but the truth of the matter is Hitler did not kill 11 million overnight. It was after a series of “small violations” that the murder of all those people took place. Even more important, the document was not written before the Holocaust, but as a result of it, which reinforces the importance of abiding by it. We would also like to think of Hitler and other “man of destruction” as other worldly whereas in reality they are like you or I. I, however, am not going to exterminate an entire population, but is that because I have a capacity for human rights and he did not. If it is so instinctual, then why do these things happen and again to my earlier point, why do we need this piece of paper anyway. Is it to remind of us that we are human or that other people

Related Documents