The Influence Of Lorraine Hansberry's A Raisin In The Sun

Improved Essays
Raised in Chicago, Illinois by parents who believed in equal education, embracing african heritage, and becoming a strong black women during the late 50’s, early 60’s, Lorraine Hansberry’s parents taught her that education is the key to success and in order to be a successful woman you have to learn the ability to be strong and independent. Along with this, Lorraine 's parents bestowed on her the value of remembering her African Heritage. Lorraine Hansberry’s own life influenced her play, A Raisin in the Sun because of her family 's values about African history, Education, and lastly being a strong Black Woman during these various civil rights movements within the society of the early 50’s through the 60’s.
Throughout Lorraine Hansberry’s life
…show more content…
During the 50’s and 60’s, even though blacks and white racism was the main issue, women 's segregation was a leading topic. Growing up in the Hansberry Household, her parents stressed the need to have pride to be a woman, and to be an educated woman at that. Lorraine Hansberry speaks about her influential teachers as well as her mother and their advice on being an independent woman during this time. Because of the black and white racism and segregation, many women were being looked down upon. Hansberry speaks about the identity of a strong black woman by stating, “A woman who is willing to be herself and pursue her own potential runs not so much the risk of loneliness, as the challenge of exposure to more interesting men - and people in general” (Hansberry). Quoted by Lorraine Hansberry regarding her views on women 's rights. Lorraine Hansberry believed that women should have proud of their gender, and not succumbing to the stereotypes of women during the civil rights era. In A Raisin in the Sun, Walter degrades his sister, Beneatha about her career. Beneatha; as mentioned earlier, is a young, free-spirited young adult, in medical school attempting to become one of the few female doctors. As an older male, Walter Younger believed that Beneatha should be a “normal” woman and either be a nurse, or a mother. Throught Lorraine Hansberry’s career many people; just as Walter, questions if Lorraine should be a in the theater and writing industry. Walter speaking to his younger sister Beneatha says, “Who the hell told you you had to be a doctor? If you so crazy ‘bout messing ‘round with sick people - then go be a nurse like other women - or just get married and be quiet...” (Hansberry, 12-13) Spoken by Walter too Beneatha, he expresses his feelings regarding

Related Documents

  • Improved Essays

    With the help of many organizations, Little was acquitted and set free. Joan Little continued to be an advocate for those who could not speak up for themselves. Although white women were her campaigners, African American women believed that she was the “dramatic symbol” and the Free Joan Little Movement became an appropriate site,—or somewhere where women could come and support one another—this helped raise feminist consciousness and allowed for sisterhoods to strengthen to new levels (275). The Black Power movement was essential and can still be seen today in campaigns like Black Lives Matter. Education is key and placing everything in a historical context is essential, these movements would have never happened if these women did not take on the leadership roles, once not available to them, and stride.…

    • 763 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Improved Essays

    Skeeter In The Help

    • 666 Words
    • 3 Pages

    Aibileen and Minnie shared their experiences with Skeeter as she took down notes. As the stories went on, more black maids joined them to share their experience what it was like to be a black maid. All of them described it as raising a white child that will grow up and be as arrogant as their mother. Skeeter began to see the truth of their mistreatment and was influenced to create awareness to their civil rights. After the many stories and influences Skeeter was able to publish her book.…

    • 666 Words
    • 3 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Improved Essays

    African American Equality

    • 1314 Words
    • 6 Pages

    Stewart’s speech advocating for the education of black women, Mary Church Terrell’s “The Progress of Colored Women”, and Barbara Jordan’s “Who, Then, Will Speak for the Common Good” chronologically, represent the progression of equality in the United States. In 1832, African-Americans had no rights, were segregated from whites, and lacked opportunities. To help change this disturbing reality, Maria W. Stewart stressed the importance of education for black women who were free, since they had more opportunities than slaves. Later on, in 1904, Mary Church Terrell explains to a foreign audience how far black women have come, however they still face obstacles from those who wanted them to remain oppressed. Seventy-two years later, in 1976, Congresswoman Barbara Jordan addresses the Democratic Party at the Democratic National Convention.…

    • 1314 Words
    • 6 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Improved Essays

    Even though she was a woman, Elizabeth Cady Stanton and others said, “They thought blacks must be given the right to vote first” (Shea 17). She was selfless because Ms. Stanton knew that if they tried to fight both suffrage movements at once, both would fail. Elizabeth Cady Stanton was a leader by example, she acted upon a situation and others usually followed close behind. “Those who had not wanted to hear what she had to say had then been in the minority” (Gornick 5). Elizabeth Cady Stanton was a positive leader with an effective way of influencing people.…

    • 1064 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Improved Essays

    This is important because the 1970’s mark the advances in the civil rights movement and the rise of the feminist movement. Since Angelou was African American, a woman, and confident, she played a large role in advocating for rights. During this time, Angelou also wrote a book called I Know Why the Caged Bird Sings. This controversial book made the best seller list, but was banned in many schools because of its inappropriate content about a sexual abuse story. This goes to show that Angelou is not only a talented writer, but she writes about what she knows with no fear of the consequences she may receive.…

    • 434 Words
    • 2 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Improved Essays

    In Netflix’s romance/drama series Greys Anatomy (2005) Ellen Pompeo plays the role of Meredith Grey. Meredith Grey is a young new medical school graduate on her way to being a surgeon. Throughout the 305 episodes thus far, Meredith has made many dramatic changes. Meredith undergoes many mental changes but also some physical. Meredith’s mental demeanor changes when she becomes an actual surgeon.…

    • 1501 Words
    • 7 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Improved Essays

    Davison (1987) and Clayton and Stalling (2000) finds that black women that are working towards officeholder positions are facing challenges daily, due to being a women of color, being judged because of her identity, and sex oppression. These are all racial implication, this author believes that the black women working towards these higher positions, are being views upon their looks, and color; instead of their educational back grown, experience, and political achievements. Clayton and Stalling make suggestions to their audience, on how to achieve colorblindness, but also that beyond all the ending result is to obtain an executive position. Davison, Clayton, and Stalling gives strategies to overcome these challenges, and omission to move forward and continue to strive to make history. Green and King (2001) finds that the key to black women holding leadership positions, is back empowerment.…

    • 645 Words
    • 3 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Superior Essays

    Black Women In The 1800s

    • 1254 Words
    • 5 Pages

    Ours is not and never has been a struggle simply against sexism but one waged against the multiplicative oppressions of sex, class, and race united in one single body. That discrimination can be seen as both positive and negative positive, in that it allows one group to have access to opportunities or privileges denied to others and yet negative because the type of employment and salary levels are too often restricted or reduced because we are both women and persons of color. As a black woman and going to college to better my future and having the funds, resources and my families help I do believe that maybe that puts me at an advantage from other black women or women in general. Not many can afford to go to college and have absolute support from their family. I believe that we need…

    • 1254 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Superior Essays
  • Improved Essays

    It recognizes the pain and hardships she has had to overcome and her emergence as a force to be reckoned with. Among Angelou's other poems, “Phenomenal Woman” is the black woman's feminist outcry. Angelou proclaims that being a woman is not about being pretty and that women are beautiful because they are strong, capable, proud, and independent. “Weekend Glory” is a humorous guidebook to living a successful life as a single black woman. Therein Angelou expounds on the blessing of work (even if it is not the highest paying), staying out of debt, going to church, going dancing, and being thankful for being a woman of color.…

    • 963 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Decent Essays

    Growing up as an African American in 1903 would be difficult, but Annie Johnson seems to keep her balance and her morals. In the story “New Directions” by Maya Angelou, Annie Johnson is a single mother with two kids, who starts a new life for herself after she and her husband split amicably. Annie Johnson is a very hardworking, dedicated, and sacrificial woman. Annie Johnson shows these traits and this shows that she is a person who values morals. Annie Johnson is a very hardworking woman.…

    • 476 Words
    • 2 Pages
    Decent Essays