Language Development In Early Childhood

Decent Essays
Language is the core of communication; it can be seen, heard or acted out. The delivery of language is conveyed in distinctive ways socially and culturally and shapes how children develop their own means of language. Gee describes language as being viewed as cognitive, material and social (Gee and Hayes, 2011. P6). The social and cultural changes that occur in a child’s life expose them to a variety of different meanings and ways in which language can be absorbed. Due to these factors it is important that the classroom environment is able to be flexible and invite these differences into the classroom. It’s the everyday familiarity of spoken and written language that can sometimes make it difficult to understand and appreciate the complexity …show more content…
These are phonological development, lexical development and morpho-syntactic development; all of these stages are inter-related in development and the using of language (Hoff, 2009). Even before a child is born the rhythms and sounds that are heard from inside the womb may be why a newborn prefers its mother voice and the fascination behind a mothers face (McDevitt, 2013. Pp. 346). A newborns first sounds that they produce isn’t in speech as such but in different cries and noises, as the first year progresses vocal development begins to form first by the creation of canonical syllables, which leads to reduplicated babbling through to the first words of an infant (Hoff, 2009) this occurs over a child’s first year. This area of development intertwines with lexical development as infants begin to understand their first word between 10-15months of age; a child’s vocabulary begins to grow continually around 18months 50 words fast forward to 6 years and the average vocabulary size is around 14,000 words (Hoff, 2009) which will to continue to grow with age. As a child begins to increase their vocabulary sentences begin to form leading into the Morpho-synatic development stage at around 24 months of age. This then develops gradually as a child’s grammar and complexity of sentences develops (Hoff, 2009). These developmental stages of language development …show more content…
From different countries, cultures and environment different dialects of English is formed. The differences in the different types of English dialect can be small but it is these small differences that lead to the assumption that a child is ‘lazy’ or incorrect in their delivery of English (Eades, 2013. Pp78) when this is the cultural experience to language development that the child has been exposed to in their development. In no way does this mean that there is only one type of English dialect that is correct but it is important to be educated about the different dialects in English. Small differences between pronunciation of different words and sounds within the English vocabulary are often specific to a particular social or regional group (Eades, 2013. Pp78). Different dialects of Australian English include Standard Australian English, Aboriginal English and non- standard English. It is essential as an educator to be aware of not only the cultural and socially differences in language development in children but the different types of dialects of English and the limitations of non-English speaking children and the obstacles that may arise from this in the classroom. By educators creating positive learning environments for children of Aboriginal English can help students to

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