The Importance Of Human Rights In Australia

1378 Words 6 Pages
A basic human right is a life of opportunity and dignity, free from discrimination and disadvantage. The concept of human rights recognises the inherent value of every person, including Aboriginal people. Human rights are to be enjoyed by everyone. Human rights are important to Aboriginal people, particularly Aboriginal Australians, because they are an essential component to everyday life. Human rights for Aboriginal Australians mean that they live a dignified life within Australian society, where they have their Aboriginal practices, customs and behaviours accepted, and furthermore, embraced. However, Australia has failed to protect Aboriginal Australians’ basic human rights. As a consequence, Aboriginal Australians experience racial discrimination …show more content…
The UNDRIP affirms the minimum standards for the survival, dignity and well being of Indigenous people worldwide. The UNDRIP includes fundamental and foundational human rights of Indigenous people, which can be categorised into four key principles. These principles are, self-determination, participation in decision-making, respect for and protection of culture, and equality and non-discrimination. Although originally voting against the UNDRIP in 2007, Australia finally declared its support in …show more content…
However, Australia voted against the adoption of the provision of self-determination. Consequently, this clearly provided the UN Australia’s attitude towards Indigenous people (Xanthaki 2009). Since then there have been many well-intended efforts to improve the representation of Aboriginal people in policy and decision-making. However, they have all diminished or have come to a standstill. In 1990, the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Commission (ATSIC) was established as a statutory authority to oversee and manage Indigenous affairs and programs. This was deemed as a significant step for Indigenous people in gaining self-determination in Australia, as it would enable Aboriginal Australians the opportunity to be able to participate in political and civic processes. However, in 2005 the Howard Coalition government announced that ATSIC would be abolished. This occurred without Indigenous consultation. Following this, the National Indigenous Council was established as an advisory body to the Commonwealth Government. This too, was abolished after only four years of existence. Currently, there is the Indigenous Advisory Council, created by the Abbott Government, which is amending the Commonwealth Constitution to recognise Indigenous People. However, the Council has made several unsuccessful attempts to agree on the wording for the amendment. This Council does not have any

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