The Effects Of Alzheimer's Disease

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Alzheimer’s Disease Alzheimer’s, which at its worst case is referred to as dementia, is a progressive disease that eats away at the brain and controls the ability to function (Horr 2015) According to Mitchell Clionsky, this disease is common among people of older age causing a mental dysfunction triggering the ability to think, remember and reason as well as behavioral abilities. (Clionsky 2015) These factors can drastically affect the body emotionally. Some patients get frustrated and mad due to not remembering certain tasks that needed to be completed. It’s definitely not easy to have a disease like this, to forget the memories, the last phone call conversation or to even forget what was consumed for breakfast. People diagnosed will eventually …show more content…
For people who have Alzheimer’s, the brain has a deficit in the transport of the nucleus of DNA methyltransferase 1 and RNA polymerase II with an abnormal sequence in the cytoplasm (Mastroeni 2013). This is so vital to the process because it disrupts the transport of transcription between the nucleus and the cytoplasm, which leads to this disease. Also a big factor is remodeling of the synaptic connections. The regeneration of new connections is important for learning, memory and brain repair. When a problem occurs with this process, the brain remains damaged and becomes dysfunctional. One way to distinguish between a diseased brain and a normal brain is by the size of it. If it is shrunken, it indicates that the person has Alzheimer’s. Within the brain, there are amyloid plaques seen everywhere. The amyloid plaque becomes embedded in the cell membrane. Once those plaques are on there, the plaque gets attached to the brain and is hard for it to be reversed; however this process can be slowed down. In a normal non-diseased brain, the tau proteins are functional, which stabilize the microtubules. In Alzheimer’s, the neurofilbrillary tangles become distortions of the tau proteins in the neurons, which become all tangled up and those microtubules lose their function (Mastroeni 2013). That then affects the person’s ability to function and work in life and it damages …show more content…
Once people have it, the person has it forever, but as stated earlier, is caught at an early stage people can do something about it to slow it down. That is because the brain gets damaged and once that damage happens to it, it cannot repair itself. According to Belluck, there are five approved drugs that help slow down the process of this progressive disease. The medications are Aricept, Exelon, Namenda, Namzaric and Razadyne. These drugs help slow the breakdown of the neurotransmitter of acetylcholine or either block the overproduction of glutamate in the brain (Belluck 2016). These treatments must be continuous for the patient to take the full effect and slow the process of the disease. If those diagnosed don’t like to take medications, the patient has other choices to help with Alzheimer’s. Studies show that having some cognitive training, rehabilitation and stimulation therapy helps people with Alzheimer’s (Ballard

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