The Deaths Of The Death Marches In The Holocaust

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Approximately 6 million jews with 6 million additional people from other groups were murdered in the Holocaust, at the same time the Death Marches were a big part of the deaths in the Holocaust. The Death Marches occurred towards the end of WWII, German forces knew their time was up(Death). Prisoners no longer feared death, thats clearly evident today. It can be inferred that their only goal was to survive; Survive the next couple of hours, the night, the week. The marches damaged the Jewish and non-Jewish people involved completely. It was the time between 1944-1945 that the nightmare known as the Death Marches began. Due to mental illness, physical illness and genocide the Death Marches had a great impact on the prisoners. Genocide was …show more content…
One of the biggest marches was from Auschwitz. Before the march started German forces killed thousands of inmates. It can be implied that they thought that would be the easiest way to get rid of the “evidence” of a cruel environment once American forces arrived. For that reason The SS guards forcefully made approximately 58,000 jewish and non-jewish prisoners march an endless route that lasted up to approximately 5 days.( Auschwitz-Birkenau) During the evacuation of Auschwitz camp the SS soldiers left the wounded and sick inmates to wilt and die. In the mind of the German Officials, its certain they thought they’d die since they were incapable of doing anything. Before they left the Camp they were given a ration of bread to live on. This affected the prisoners hugely, which ever path the individual took lead them into a horrible situation that would eventually end the Jewish or non-jewish inmate 's …show more content…
He and His father were a victim of the death marches. He tells us that these marches were literally everyone for themselves. The groups of Jewish and non-jewish participants were definitely endangered from his perspective. For instance, when they would pass through the Germans cities, German workers would throw pieces of bread into the wagon and it’d become a battlefield between the passengers yet it’d be entertaining for the Germans. (Night) Since they were malnourished and hopeless of course they’d scramble at each other for a crumb causing them to kill each other. It can be implied that this had a great impact on these people, considering that every time they would stop some group of passengers had just died. This falls under all three categories of mental, physical illness and genocide.Also Elie states that seeing these unhealthy and poorly treated pedestrians did not once phase the German civilians.(Night) For that reason, it can be inferred that the community of victims was considered to already mean less. With them being considered less, tells us that no one cared enough so just to make matters worse, they caused an even bigger problem for the population of Jewish and non

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