The Dangers Of The Pine Ridge Indian Reservation

2038 Words 8 Pages
On June 25, 1876, approximately six fateful months after the Commissioner of Indian Affairs issued a strong ultimatum requiring all Native Americans in the northern plains to relocate to a designated reservation, the Lakota Sioux, Northern Cheyenne, and Arapaho Native American tribes remained in the golden, rugged foothills of south-central Montana, near the Little Bighorn River ("Battle of the Little Bighorn"). Lieutenant George Armstrong Custer was attempting an element of surprise attack with all his troops as they marched forward to the massive camp to terminate the tribes. But the Native Americans were ready to fight, and they had no crippling doubts or fears. In the words of Low Dog, an Oglala Sioux, "I did not think anyone would come …show more content…
Just behind Mount Rushmore, which signifies unification for all people from some American figures, the Pine Ridge Indian Reservation has created a living hell. It is larger than Delaware and Rhode Island combined, but smaller than Connecticut; Pine Ridge is home to approximately 17,000 people (Nordlinger). This reservation is the poorest Native American reservation in the United States (Nordlinger). Other reservations, just like Pine Ridge, are ravaged by alcoholism, suicide, and lack of education and healthcare (“Living Conditions”). The Native Americans once were a hearty group of individuals who could stand on their own two feet. Today, it is another story, as the government back in the 19th century treated them as if they were dirt. Through all the hardships and pain the new settlers and government of the United States made the Native Americans endure in the past, the only appropriate apology as U.S. citizens would be to extend further assistance by boosting recognition of every tribe, increasing the amount of monuments, adding substantial scholarships for the youth, and escalating government …show more content…
They were shipped to the country to become slaves for rich, white males in the southern region on their plantations, where they picked cotton in the hot, scorching sun all day. In today’s society, they are represented quite well; there is an African American president, several Black politicians, public figures, as well as athletes. Native Americans, on the other hand, are sent to reservations with little to no industries, which in turn sends the poor areas into a negative spiral with lacking necessities to make them notable. The country can copy its efforts for trying to compensate for the torture placed on Blacks to the various Indian tribes. There has been some improvement, as former president George H.W. Bush instated a National American Indian Heritage month as November in 1990 (“Heritage Month 2014”). They deserve so much more than a month, though. Efforts need to be established to also start a Native American or American Indian Day. A handful of states, such as California and South Dakota, recognize this as a national holiday, but it needs to be collectively accepted by all 50 states and the District of Columbia (“Heritage Month 2014”). On this day, educators could inform

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