The Bubonic Plague In The 19th Century

Decent Essays
1340s Worst Friend the Black Death

This life is a very dangerous and hazardous life we live. One day things are normal and the next the world is ripping apart from itself. The Bubonic Plague, also known as The Black Death, was the most devastating pandemic to humanity in the history of the world. Roughly twenty five to 50 million people died and many more were impacted by the catastrophe the plague left behind. The Black Death swept through Western Europe during the late 1340’s, killing more than two thirds of the population, changing the Church, breaking apart families, sinking the economy, and leaving the western world in ruins.
Bubonic plague initially began in central Asia and by using the highly traveled Silk Road it spread to Crimea by the year 1346. From Crimea, the bubonic plague was transmitted by rat fleas that survived on the blood of rats that resided regularly on the many merchant ships traveling from Crimea and Egypt to most of Europe. It then spread throughout the European continent and the Mediterranean region and is estimated to have killed almost thirty to sixty percent of the total population of Europe. When the virus finally died off the population of the world was reduced from an estimated four hundred and fifty million to about three hundred fifty million by the bubonic plague in the fourteenth century.
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With 1/3 of all Europe now in the graves in the ground, people would have a rough time trying to bouncing back. Families were having to rebirth, the economy was having to have another jump start, churches never were the same with power, food had to be replanted and grown, and doctors would venture out and try to find new ways to prohibit a breakout from ever happening again. It stands as a monument in history as one of the worst times that so many started and so few actually came out on the other side to tell about

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