Stereotypes In Pulp Fiction

Improved Essays
Pulp Fiction is Quentin Tarantino's most revered film, debuting in 1994. It features a series of disjointed stories surrounding a crime boss, Marsellus, and his hitmen, particularly, Vince Vega, a loyal, but sloppy and inept man who is assigned to various tasks ranging from taking care of Marsellus’ wife, to assassinating a boxer, Butch, who double crossed Marsellus. However, he is only one of many different fully flushed out characters in the film. The film aims to explore these different characters in depth over it’s length. The film nearly disregards formal plot conventions in order to accomplish this. The stories are only loosely connected, told in a non-linear style, and without a real conflict. It would be difficult to even declare a …show more content…
This is because the film is more concerned with the environment the characters are currently in, rather than how they got there or where they are going next. The film presents multiple independent, yet interlaced scenarios. There is no centralized plot, this allows Tarantino to focus on other aspects, especially the characters, without creating too much investment in any single character, each has redeeming qualities as well as flaws. One character, Marsellus, the boss is always shrouded in mystery. His character is developed by the characters around him. They take great caution around him so as not to rile him. They often gossip about him, but never directly confront him out of fear. This lends to his mystery and power. Additionally, he is hardly ever seen in the film, only the back of his head, and he never reveals what is in his briefcase, but only relays that it is of the utmost importance to him, all of which further adds to his mystery. Another character, Butch, is developed as a foil to Vincent Vega. For all of Vega’s flaws and carelessness, Butch is astute, and whereas Vega is extremely loyal to Marsellus, Butch crosses him, and lives for himself, only saving Marsellus later because he deems it the right thing to do, not out of any emotional commitment to Marsellus or anyone else. Butch is also much more secure in himself, while Vega would discuss with himself how to deal with Mia Wallace,

Related Documents

  • Improved Essays

    accurate portrayals of the reality of the situations featured in the given film; in those cases, the work reflects a version of the truth altered by the filmmaker and accepted by the audience. In Quentin Tarantino’s film Pulp Fiction, the use of hyperreal violence and racial stereotypes reflects upon the attitudes of modern American society. By the 1990’s, a number of filmmakers had taken to hyperreal violence for use as a critical cinematic device. Though Tarantino was not the…

    • 1235 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Improved Essays

    The femme fatale became a very popular character in crime fiction in the United States during the mid-twentieth century (Jaber, 1). This character is a woman who is portrayed to be hyper-sexual and is manipulative towards men. The femme fatale appears in hard-boiled crime fiction and film noir. She also was featured on many pulp covers making seductive poses because of the rise of sex in books (Horsley). Throughout the mid-twentieth century, the femme fatale character changed. Throughout this essay…

    • 1111 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Superior Essays

    Pulp Fiction Analysis

    • 1762 Words
    • 8 Pages

    Pulp Fiction is a screenplay of three different stories which merge between each other. The film is very interesting because is a story about corrupted people that talks about morals and religion, which is very contradictive compared to our community standards…

    • 1762 Words
    • 8 Pages
    Superior Essays