Influence Of The French Revolution: The Marquis Of Lafayette

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The marquis de Lafayette
He has served in America voluntarily with the purpose to fight against Britain. Spielvogel noted that “Lafayette returned to France with ideas of individual liberties and notions of republicanism and popular sovereignty” (567). Influenced by the American Declaration of Independence, the soldiers who came back from America wanted to pursue liberty. Their ideas greatly influenced the early stages of the French Revolution. It should be studied because these people played an important role in the arising of the French Revolution with the attempt to establish a new social order. The French Revolution is remarkable in its significant influence on the modern political world.

Third Estate
The third estate is the civilians
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They seek alliance to expand the correspondence network. Spielvoge indicated that
“there were nine hundred Jacobin clubs in France associated with the Parisian center one year later” (576). It is one of the most radical organizations that arose during the Revolution. They were the main advocates of republicanism during the Revolution. It should be studied today because the Jacobin advocated freedom and equality, which was the initial intention of the Revolution.

Nation in arms
In order to face the crisis and deal with the enemies, the Committee of Public Safety has raised an army of 650,000 called a nation in arms. Spielvoge noted that it retreated the allies across the Rhine and defeated the Austrian Netherlands (579). With the mobilization of the French government, the ever largest army was created. The entire French had involved in the war. While it has also brought negative impact to the innocent civilians. The army became terrible gradually and lead to the carnage. It should be studies because it implied that it is necessary to make deliberate decision of the arm’s scale. If it is out of control, then all the citizens will be
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Then they continued to meet at this place until they established a French constitution. Spielvoge noted that these actions composed the first step of the French Revolution because they had no legal rights at that time (572). The king intended to use force to collapse the Estates-General, so they were doomed to make a revolution. The Third Estate has stirred up the common people’s desire to fight for their rights. It should be studied because the Third Estate played an important role in the beginning of the

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