Essay On The Importance Of Individualism

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Philosophical Importance The Romantic period was full of new art forms and pieces of literature. Different pieces of written literature took over, it became quite popular. Each piece displayed a unique philosophy, such as celebration of the spirit of the individual or belief in a simple, mindful lifestyle.“Self-Reliance”, written by Ralph Waldo Emerson, is an essay discussing the importance of expressing individuality, avoiding false consistency and following someone’s own instincts. Thus, showing the celebration of the spirit of the individual. Walden written by Henry David Thoreau, is an essay of Henry’s life in the woods. One day, he decided to leave and experience what life would be like away from his everyday life. His reasons for going to live there expresses the Romantic …show more content…
In the essay, “Self-Reliance”, the ideas of being an individual and not following the crowd are proven to be the way to live life; Mr Keating agrees with the essay’s belief on the philosophy. Throughout the literature, Emerson promotes the importance of individualism. In his piece, he says, “... With conformity, the world whips you with its displeasure” (Emerson 363). One who is a conformist is is a follower and does not speak their mind, and with this they cannot be an individual. Emerson is saying that, if one is a conformist life will not be lived to its fullest, it will end up in a dissapointment. This could also be portrayed as do not follow others, be proud to be unique and life will not disappoint. Also said by Emerson, “... Whose would be a man must be nonconformist” (Emerson 326). He is saying to be a man, which does not necessarily mean man it could be any important and powerful figure, one has to be their own. To succeed, one needs to celebrate their individualism. This

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