Mary Mcleod Bethune Speech

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Mary McLeod Bethune is the world’s greatest leader Educator, humanitarian and American civil rights leader, born July 10, 1875, a child of former slaves Growing up as a child from former slaves she realized the cruel intentions on how this country and decides to make a diversity She is the only child out of her 17 siblings that has an education in which also she was the youngest of her siblings She says, " Invest in the human soul Who knows, it might be a diamond in the rough" She values humans for the fact of knowing the history of slavery and the power and ability to overcome it It 's figurative meaning refers to unpolished diamonds that has potential to have more value once polished She is chief for creating equality for race and gender …show more content…
Her best humanitarian endeavor is finding the National Council of Negro Woman (NCNW) This organization dedicated to women of color to help improve their lives and its communities The mission is advancing opportunities and providing a quality life Bethune saw a need to instill in Negro women to become strong minded with power and to become leaders to help diminish sexism and racism Being the most African-American organizations under guidance of Mary McLeod Bethune her ideas of bringing together African American woman to create a strong bond of skills and expand women 's voices on a social and political platform While forming the organization she had a few hardships and resistance from other national leaders She saw the demand to equip the power and widen the leadership of African-American women from the NCNW organization Their new agenda for the millennium is an assertion to take immediate action around education, health, economic improvement and public policy in attempt to build a powerful Black America With this organization McLeod Bethune envision a undivided strength of black women fighting to better racial circumstances worldwide Their focus is on accumulating information valid contacts, and sponsoring scholarship and school funding programs The organization most remarkable achievement White House Conference on Governmental Cooperation in access to the problems for Negro Woman and children NCNW engages in the campaign to integrate assisting women with …show more content…
Bethune being a civil right activist she protest for many things She was an ambassador and advisor for education, child welfare and home ownership She also served at a secretary consultant for the US Secretary of War for selection of African American female candidates to become an officer She had a love for helping people and being a humanitarian Mary McLeod Bethune was the Vice President for the honorable National Association for the Advancement of Colored Persons (NAACP), a stance in which she held for a lifetime In her next venture she assure the Woman’s Army’s Corps is racially unified as a member of the consulting board Being the only woman of color delegated by President Harry Truman endowing in the conference of the United Nations in 1945 She was also administrator of Negro Affairs in dealing with in Nation Youth Administration for her love of youth and help raising them so they can have a better understanding about life and have sense of what equality should be Additionally, she lead the “unofficial cabinet” sought over by Franklin D Roosevelt in which this program which gave the opportunity for African Americans to have a say in America’s government

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