Lucinda H. Mackethan's My Bondage And My Freedom

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In this source, the author, Lucinda H. MacKethan, inquires into the experiences and struggles of Douglass which enable his mastery over literacy and language in the pursuit of achieving civil and human rights. Like Douglass’s Narratives, there have been many before and after his time to be published with titles of struggle, and not a victory over, an enslaved cultural definition. An American man is undoubtedly viewed as endowed base on our nation 's beginnings with the inalienable right to freedom, however, to be an “American Slave” is to be denied these rights. The author discusses how language flourished starting with the ideas of Thomas Jefferson. These ideas correlate with the romantic period that holds the supreme stage of literature. …show more content…
The author, Sundquist, states that there are recollecting differences between My Bondage and My Freedom (1855) and Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass (1845) and that may both be comparatively accurate. However, My Bondage and My Freedom is more significant because it furthers Douglass’s journey and accounts of his life to date. Important events such as his successful oratorical career, his extensively renowned tour of Britain, the founding of the North Star, his battle against discrimination in the North, and his eventual break with the abolitionist William Lloyd Garrison. His Narratives have been used as an attempt to both refute accusations of an unrealistic story and to seize personal power over it. In transfiguring his slave works, he was forced to flee to England. All of his literary content and the furthering development on all of his autobiographies, the lesson most evident that Douglass has learned is the power of literacy. However, living in America has sort of restricted him to the degree of what a black man should be knowledgeable on. Houston Baker has remarked, “the Narrative itself represents a public version of Douglass 's self already molded by white America, for the voice of the unwritten self, once it is subjected to the linguistic codes, literary …show more content…
The author of this source, Sundquist, Eric J., is an American scholar of literature and culture of America, with a special interest in African American literature. My focus for this overall research paper is how education played a vital role in Douglass’s success and how overcoming these preconceptions that blacks do not have the ability to learn can be deterred through Douglass’s legacy. I feel as though his struggles and tributes aided in influencing other black Americans to follow the same pattern of life. Throughout his developments of his narratives, many people assumed that his life experiences were false based on the fact that a black man such as himself could not possibly go from being a slave to being a highly educated and successful black man. Douglass basically had to modify himself in order to be accepted by the whites, but still ultimately retaining that self-respect and self-reliance as a black American. I would like to use this in my overall paper because it provides insightful information on the differences between his narratives and his other literary works and how they all contributed greatly to Douglass’s literary and activist lifestyle. I would also like to connect Douglass to another strong advocate for black education, which would be Maya

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