Relativism In Thomas Kuhn's Essay

Decent Essays
The book, structure of Scientific Revolutions, is one of the most famous books authored by Thomas Kuhn. He introduces a wide array of concepts within the essay that explains the course of scientific revolution in the world. However, the essay has received wide criticisms from other scholars especially for what they refer to as his ‘relativistic’ nature. To understand or take a position as to whether the arguments of his charges of relativism are valid, an understanding of the term is necessary, along with its relevance in his essay. As a result, this paper will examine Kuhn arguments to identify his response to the charges of relativism and to infer whether the response was any adequate or not.
The term ‘relativism’ refers to the view or belief
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Kuhn states that the two ideas answer the charges as they relate to relativism and irrationality. Kuhn agrees that the charges of relativism may be right as applied to culture and development, however, in science, it is not. He states that his ideas of incommensurability could be explained further allowing for translations in between the different worldviews (202-203). Kuhn states that the other philosophers presents what could be referred to as “serious misconstruing” of his original theory as he adjusts it to allow for translators that facilitate transitions of paradigm (198). The translators understand the different in language, hence can explain the different worldviews with opposing paradigms, into a new language having all the anomalies and responses. The translations would play the role of persuasion and conversion especially for scientists and theorists helping them realize how the opposing paradigm may have solved some of the problems that may have seemed impossible to solve in their paradigm (202-203). Clearly, the patches in the theory of incommensurability were solved by the phenomenon or use of translators. The presence of meta-values that guide science is one of the main reasons why scientists may convert to new and opposing

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