Catcher In The Rye Genre Essay

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When deciding what genre of novel to write, it can be difficult for a writer to choose since there are so many to choose from. Even if a writer often chooses to write novels of mostly one type of genre, it can be nice to mix things up. In the beginning of The Catcher in the Rye, written by J.D. Salinger, the protagonist’s brother has died and the protagonist is in a period of awkwardness. Then, throughout the book the protagonist encounters many situations where his way of thinking is challenged. By the ending of the book, he obtains his maturity and discovers his identity. From these characteristics, it is apparent that the Catcher in the Rye is a bildungsroman, a type of book in which the protagonist stops being an adolescent and matures. …show more content…
All of these steps are presented in the beginning of “Catcher and the Rye”. The loss that the protagonist, Holden, starts the book with is the death of his brother, Allie. This is apparent because when Holden talks about how he reacted to Allie’s death he avoids how he feels emotionally and only writes about what he did; for example Holden writes, “My hand still hurts me once in a while…but outside of that I don’t care to much. I mean I’m not going to be a goddam surgeon or a violinist or anything anyway” (Salinger 39). In the quote Holden insists, “that he doesn’t care too much,” which is an obvious lie since he then says he’s, “not going to be a goddam surgeon,” which is almost irrelevant to the topic. Holden also has a lot of awkward things happening in his life at the time of the book like how he is switching schools a lot. Holden reasons, “I mean I’ve left schools and places I didn’t even know I was leaving them. I hate that. I don’t care if it is a …show more content…
This tells us that he doesn’t always feel good about leaving a place. Since Holden is constantly switching schools he doesn’t get any time to become friends with the other students there and he doesn’t even like the ones that seem to be the closest thing to a friend he has there. Holden describes one of his “friends” in this reference, “Stradlater was more of a secret slob. He always looked all right, Stradlater, but for instance, you should’ve seen the razor he shaved himself with. It was always rusty as hell and full of lather and hairs and crap. He never cleaned it or anything” (Salinger 27). It is clear that he doesn’t really like Stradlater because of the way he describes him. This is only one of many negative comments that Holden makes constantly throughout the first few chapters about Stradlater and his other “friends”. After meeting his schoolmates and learning about them, Holden decides to leave the school early instead of going in a few days. This is the part of a bildungsroman when a character goes on a journey. The rest of the book or a good part of it will likely be spent on this journey because Holden states, “I’d get the hell out of Pency... I decided I’d take a room in a hotel in New York… and take it easy till Wednesday” (Salinger 51). This gives Holden plenty of time to include all the features of a bildungsroman since at this point in the book it is about a

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