Similarities Between Socrates And Gorgias

Good Essays
Reanna Sahoo
Dr. Albrecht
PHL-225-04
15 December 2017
Gorgias and Nicomachean Ethics
In the first part of the Gorgias, Callicles explains his view on the best way of living. He believes in the maximization of pleasure. He says to gratify self with desires and maximize them, a concept known as self-gratification. A way Callicles mentions to fulfill one’s desires is using courage and intelligence to get what they want. Through intelligence comes practical knowledge, which is knowledge of activities that will secure your good. An example of this is cookery, where the aim is to please the master. The cook does not think about what is nutritionally good for the master as the goal is just to please him. A man who is going to a live a full life must allow his desires to become as mighty as they may be and he should never repress them. The best life is the life of pleasure procured in whatever way is possible to obtain pleasure. Callicles believes that the wrong, whom he considers to be the best, ought to rule over the weak. He believes that
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The both believe the good is happiness. They both believe the soul is involved in happiness and that it is the exercise of self-fulfillment through integrity. Socrates says happiness is living in harmony with one’s self and living in truth to one’s self. It is a feeling of happiness or self-satisfaction associated with the activity of self-fulfillment. It is only attainable through virtues. Aristotle refers to virtue as the potential excellence of an individual. “Human good turns out to be activity of soul in accordance with virtue” (Nicomachean Ethics, p. 52/2). Socrates says this excellence is what a person strives to achieve in order to attain happiness and that this excellence comes from the soul. The two philosophers believe that wisdom is the primary virtue because it is through wisdom that one is able to obtain the self-knowledge necessary to realize one’s

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