Compare Plato's Allegory Of The Cave And Our Own Education

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Republic Books VI-VII Relating to Plato’s Approach to Education
(Plato’s Pedagogy Relating to Republic VI, VII and Our Own Education) In Plato’s Republic Book VI, Socrates speaks about the philosopher king and in Book VII he tells the Allegory of the Cave, both relate to the education of the republic or of the group. When Socrates is speaking of the philosopher king in Book VI, he tells his students about the order of education and how to thin out the group into the society’s different groups. He explains what goodness by using The Analogy of the Sun in Book VI. In Book VII, the Allegory of the cave is the overall, final answer to the question of what justice, and the allegory illustrates the four states of mind, the two kinds of belief,
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These are the four approaches to knowledge, one is knowledge led by images and opinions, two is knowledge guided by practicality and common sense, the third is to seek knowledge through solved logic, like the scientific approach, and the forth is the philosophical approach, the true understanding. In Republic[Polileia] it’s written about the Allegory of the Cave, “Plato’s similes of the Line and the Cave have occasioned many interpretations. Most of the difficulties are due to Plato’s metaphorical language, and it has seemed almost impossible to find an interpretation that is perfectly coherent on philosophical and philological grounds” (Republic [Polileia]). Socrates reviews the five branches of mathematics; arithmetic, plane geometry, solid geometry, astronomy, and harmonics. And in the end of Book VII, Socrates is explaining the six stage of education of the philosopher king. One, birth to eighteen years of age would be the study of literature, test of fitness and the fittest go through physical and military training is the next three years, around the age of twenty there’s another test, the advanced go further in mathematics for ten years, the rest will be soldiers, the students then go through a dialect course for five years, then there’ll be a philosophical course starting at thirty-five years old that last for fifteen years and be a military or political person at the same time, and at the age of fifty the philosopher-ruler will be prepared to

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