African Women's Role In Colonial History

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Slavery has always been an awful thing. But It can be denied it play a major role in our history. For the purpose of this historiographical paper I will focus in slavery in the United States in colonial times. Focusing on African women something that many historian agree hasn’t been talk enough. I will look at four different historians that focus their research in the lives of African women in the time of slavery.
My first historian is Jennifer Morgan she wrote the book “laboring women’. In the introduction of her book she talks about how African women were not only used to work the land, but to also to have children and create more slaves. She argues that European man justify African slavery of women because it was the right thing to do. Due to their supposed heighted sex drive. I think Morgan’s argument about how African Women were used is very interesting one. But we have to remember that slavery was a money making business it was always about the how money and how to make more money. And that presents a problem, the mortality rate was very high. So in
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Washington talks about another aspect of slavery she talks about African women that were once or had still family that were still slaves, and how this women work to help free these other people that were still slave. Also she mentions that most African abolitionists prefer that these women only work behind the scenes, but they refuse. This is perhaps my favorite take on this issue. I love how these women took and active role to help their fellow woman. I imagine that is extremely hard to do so. These women still live in a country were haft of it was very still much pro slavery. One step in the wrong direction and these women could again find themselves under slavery again. But they still help in anyway they could to free their fellow

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