A Beautiful Mind Schizophrenia Analysis

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The definition of schizophrenia is a severe brain disorder in which people interpret reality abnormally, and it may result in some combination of hallucinations, delusions, and extremely disordered thinking and behavior. In the movie “A Beautiful Mind,” John Nash is diagnosed with schizophrenia. He had these crazy delusions that the Soviets were hiding a bomb, and he was also hallucinating three people. Although his hallucinations of Charles, William, and Marcy are different than he is, they are also similar. The characters William, Charles, and Marcy are similar to John Nash because they are all aspects that John would have liked to be or is like in his life, but also different because of how he imagined them in his mind and how opposite they

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