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13 Cards in this Set

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what is deforestation

Deforestationis the permanent destruction of forests in order to make the land available forother uses. An estimated 18 million acres (7.3 million hectares) of forest,which is roughly the size of the country of Panama, are lost each year,according to the United Nations' Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO).

deforestation facts

* About half of the world's tropical forests have been cleared (FAO)
* Forests currently cover about 30 percent of the world’s land mass (National Geographic)
* Forest loss contributes between 6 percent and 12 percent of annual global carbon dioxide emissions (Nature Geoscience)
* About 36 football fields worth of treeslost every minute (World Wildlife Fund (WWF)

THE EXPANSION AND INTENSIFICATION OFAGRICULTURE: what can Agriculture can beclassified

eitherindustrialised, where the aim is for profit, or subsistence, where the aim isto be self-sufficient and involves the growing of crops or raising livestock.


THE EXPANSION AND INTENSIFICATION OFAGRICULTURE: stats of industrilised vs subsistence

· 38% of the world is usedfor agricultural purposes


.54% of Australia’s land


THE EXPANSION AND INTENSIFICATION OFAGRICULTURE: future outlooks


It isestimated that there will 18% more land gloabally converted to agriculture by2050. Most of this will come from clearing a third of the remaining forests,savannahs and grasslands.




Over time there will also be a change in thenature of existing agricultural land. The increase in intensification ofagriculture in Europe, North America, India and China is an example of this.


example of the THE EXPANSION AND INTENSIFICATION OF AGRICULTURE:


1. Agrarian or farming revolution inthe 18th century marked the start of mechanised machinery.
2. This allowed farmers to modify andexpand their farming activities beyond their own physical labour.
3. Commercial farms became widespread and food productionincreased.
4. As farms machinery became larger and more sophisticated,farms amalgamated and were more extensively cleared. The larger ruralproperties required fewer farm workers resulting in decreased populationdensity.

LAND DRAINAGE AND RECLAMATION explain what this is


Humans have a history of adapting the land to their needs,this can be seen with reclamation of land. This is where land is gained orcreated from the sea, wetlands or riverbeds. One of the largest examples ofreclamation is the Flevopolder in the Netherlands which is the largestartificial island in the world.


THE GROWTH OF URBAN SETTLEMENT, INDUSTRY ANDMINING - how much space does urban land cover take up? and what about the lands that support these urban land cover


Urban landcover (0.47%) is relatively small on a world map. Although this is the case,the land that is required to support urban areas is large and greatlyinfluences land cover change.


THE GROWTH OF URBAN SETTLEMENT, INDUSTRY AND MINING - what change will be in the proportion of urban land cover and people in it

Urbanisation,or the proportion of people living in cities, will see more of the world’speople living in cities or the metropolitan area surrounding cities. Althoughurban areas only cover 0.47% of the world’s land area they contain more than50% of the world’s population. This percentage will increase during the nextcentury.


what did Aboriginal peoples complex system of land management include?

· Leaving adequate seedsand vegetation


· Taking some eggs, notall


· Food taboos determinedby age, status and gender


* and fire was used

explain fire

Sophisticatedsystem of patchwork burnt and regrowth areas.




Fire wasused:


· to clear areas fortravel


· promote growth


· flush possums out of thehabitats for food· no uncontrolled fires


what do they do in the modern day?

they use a acombination of modern practice with traditional knowledge and techniques. Someof the areas occur as follows:

· protection of culturalsites

· creation of seasonalharvesting calendars from traditional knowledge


· mapping and trackingwater sources


· recognition andrecording of new plants and the removal of seeds (seed bank) and weeds· reducing greenhousegases by using traditional methods of land management


· conservation of waterresources




Theseexamples are a government intiative called ‘Caring for Our Country.’

World population growth,growing affluence and advances in technology will impact on the nature, rateand extent of land cover change and potential biodiversity loss how?


- Between 1900 – 2000 theworld multiplied 3 times faster than in the rest of human history. - In 2007 the global urbanpopulation became larger than the rural population


- From industrialisation,accelerated population growth and the consequent urban expansion in developedcountries a pattern has emerged where affluence and technology hungry countriesworsened environmental quality. This technology was also used to restore andrehabilitate degraded areas. This pattern is since being repeated by developingcountries.