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75 Cards in this Set

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Athenaeus
Historian, compiled history for the library in Alexandria Performative elements
Joseph Campbell
Abydos Passion PlaY
Creation of Osiris
Memphite Drama
Osiran Cylcles
Ikhernofret
first recorded theatrical event
Herodotus
Greek Historian, noted the greeks similar to egypt
Homer
Wrote Iliad and Odyssey
Aristotle
384 BC) Greek philosopher. He wrote theater grew out of worship rites of Dionysus. Student of Plato, studied for 20 years. Established his own school, taught researched and wrote. The Poetics written in 350 BC servers as the basis of all theatre. In western thought.
Polis
city state
Dorian
Sparta and Corinth base
Ionian
Athens based
Dionysus
The Greek god of wine and fertility
Theatre of Dionysus
Theater located on the southeast slope of the Acroplis
City Dionysia
Festival celebrating Dionysus within the city limits (first known festival) (occurred in March)
Rural Dionysia
Festival celebrating Dionysus outside the city (occurred in december)
Lenaia
One of the Dionysias festivals (a later added January festival)
Thespis
Stepped forth and took the role of Dionysus. “First actor”. . Would cart around and recreate bad behavior to an audience. Thought he was teaching people how not to behave. Performed dithyrambs, called them tragedy.
Solon
“First Anti-theater” Thespis rival. He thought THespis taught people how to behave badly
“goat song”
Translated from “tragoidia” the origin of tragedy
Dithyrambs
hymns sung and dance in honor of Dionysus
Arion
Corinthian who claimed to invent drama before Thespis, first liturgical record of a dihyramb
Tragoidoi
Those who perform Arion’s drama’s
Coryphaios
Hypocrites
What the first actors were called. Meanin “interpreter” or “answerer”
Horace
Roman poet
Aeschylus
(525 BC) Dramatist/actor responsible for adding second actor. Voila. Scenes. Worshipped the “Earth Goddess” Wrote Orestia(458 BC) : Agammenon, Libation Bearers and Eumenides (only surving Greek trilogy) Wrote with “fate” philosophy. Thought events in the play parallel his own life.
Sophocles
(495 BC) Dramatist introduced the third actor. Superior writer. More human, Motivated, complicated, believable characters. Oedipus the King, Antigone, Elektra. Younger than Aeschylus but often competed with him.
Euripides
Wrote more plays and more popular, but won less awards. Much less religious plays. Less concerned with plot more with character. Easy endings. Questionable subjects: Medea killing her children, Phaedra loving her stepson. The Bacchae, The Trojan Women. Pacifist, outcast, free thinker.
Menander
A playwright, wrote over 100 plays only one survive
Prologue
Summary of action that predicate the opening of the play
Parodos
The entrance of the chorus
THe go through the "Pair o' doors"
Stasima
The main action, a series of songs and dances
Exodus
The concluding scene
satyr plays
Farce plays with chorus made up of half beast half human companions of Dionysus
Silenus
The leader of the chorus
phallic rites
Rituals around a phallus
Epicharmus
Comedy writer thought by Aristotle to invent comedy
Aristophanes
Comedy writer Lysistrata, Frogs, Birds
Old Comedy
Comedies written during pelloponessian war. Included fantasy, sex wealth , obscenities. Things that couldn’t occur in everyday life.
“happy idea”
The ruling theme of an Aristophanic comedy
Parabasis
choral ode that the audience is directly addressed, dividing the play in two parts
Komos
the final scene in a comedy.
Coma's are funny
Archon eponymous
The principal magistrate of athens
Choregoi
¬“The Producer” the benefactor chosen by the Archon to train and costume the chorus. And provided the majority of the funds to support the production
Plato
Philosopher very against theater
Didaskalos
The head actor/author who oversaw (directed ) each production
Chiton
The main actors clothes, a highly decorated tunic
Chlamys
Part of the chorus’ costume, the short cloak
Himation
the long cloak, in
Cothornus
a thick soled boot that reached the calf. Platforms
Comic costumes
exaggerated and men wore phalus’
Theatre at Thorikos
Oblong theater dating before Dionysus
Orchestra
“the dancing place” The main circular playing space. 66ft in Diameter
Thymele
Altar in the orchestra
Skene
the scene building behind the orchestra. Originally used as a dressing room. Later used within the action of the play.
Pinakes
Painted panels “flats” that could have been used to change scenes from play to play
Periaktoi
Triangular structure that turns displaying three different scenes
Ekkyklema
AWAGON, a device to reveal a tableau. Usually a platform in the main doorway of the skene.
Mechane (Machina)
A crane used to show characters flying or suspended
deus ex machine
The machine of the gods. A theatrical device that fixes everything. Contrived ending.
Parodoi
Entrance to the auditorium used by the audience in between the Skene and the orchestra
Logeion
The later adopted Greek word for theater
Odeion
“ roofed theater” later added to the theatre to house musical events and public meetings. Created a “back wall” behind the skene.
Theatron
seeing place
Middle Comedy
404 BCE-336 Peloponnesian war – Alexander the great. No chorus
New Comedy
Hellinstic Comedies
Menander
A playwright, wrote over 100 plays only one survive
Thyromata
small opening onstage, mini proscenium. Wear the scene elements are set
Poetics
Aristotle’s work
Paraskenia
The scenic wall
Proskenion
proscenium raise section on the skene
Episkenion
Second story Facade
Onkos
Headress
“mime”
Phlyakes
actors of mimes