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64 Cards in this Set

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Bast fiber
fiber removed from the stem of a plant
falx, ramie, hemp, jute
Abaca (Manilla hemp)
-leaf fiber from banana tree family in Philippines
- off white/brown
-makes ropes,cordage, floor mats, clothing
Coir
comes from a coconut
-door mats
- resist moisture & abraision
Conventional Cotton
cotton grown and processed by regualr mainstream practices
Convolutions
ribbonlike twists along a cotton fiber
-allows fibers to adhere to one another
Cornhusks (Maize)
used in area rugs- resistance to dry heat and soil
Cottonize
process of cutting fibers into shorter fibers to blend with cotton
Cuticle
waxlike film covering the outermost layer of a cotton fiber
Decortication
used to remove ramie or any bast fiber from the plant stem
Egyptian, Pima, Supima, or Sea Island Cotton
long or extra- long staple cotton
Flax
bast fiber produced by the flax plant
Gin
mechanical device used to separate cotton fibers from seeds
Green Cotton
cotton fabric that was washed with mild natural soap, but not bleached or treated other chemicals except natural dyes
Hackling
process separating bast fiber bundles into individual fibers and removing short irregular fibers.
-remove debris
Hemp
bast fiber produced by Cannabis Sativa
- long staple fibers
-rots in water
Cornhusks (Maize)
used in area rugs- resistance to dry heat and soil
Cottonize
process of cutting fibers into shorter fibers to blend with cotton or porcessing on equipment designed for cotton
Cuticle
waxlike film covering the outermost layer of a cotton fiber
Decortication
used to remove ramie or any bast fiber from the plant stem
Egyptian, Pima, Supima, or Sea Island Cotton
long or extra- long staple cotton
Henequen
-stronger than jute
-If blended can be in apparel
Hibiscus
- same family as cotton (Malvaceae)
- clarifies sugarcane juice
- can be bleached
-stronger than jute
-If blended can be in apparel
Jute
cheapest bast fiber
-burlap bags
- not used for clothes
- 3-15 ft. long
-100% recycleable and Biodegradable
- STRONG
- off white or brown
Kapok
fiber removed from the seeds of the Java Kapok or Silk Cotton Tree
Kenaf
bast fiber from Kenaf Plant
Leaf Fibers
fiber from leaves of plant
Pina, Abaca, Sisal
Line
long, combed, and better quality flax fibers
Linen
fabric made from Flax
-fibers longer than 10 in.
- warm weather
-low resiliency
-dry clean
Linters
very short cotton fibers that remain attached to the cotton seed after ginning
- used in rayon & acetate
-nail polish, gum, makeup, photo film
Lint
usable cotton fibers removed in ginning process
- fiber debris in pilling or lint traps
Lumen
hollow central canal where nutrients travel as a cotton fiber develops in the plant
Milkweed ( silkweed, asclepias cotton)
soft, lusterous hollow-floss seed hari fiber resembling Kapok
- fiberfill in comforters
- floation devices
- weak
Naturally Colored Cotton
cotton grown in colors of brown, tan, yellow, green, rust, etc.
-produce less per acre
-seel for twice as much as reg. cotton
Nodes
irregular crosswise markings present in many bast fibers
Organic Cotton
produced on farm where organic standards have been for at least 3 yrs.
Rush & Palm Fibers
used in wooden frame chairs for natural look
Pina
leaf fiber from pinapple plant
- formal wear in Philippines
-makes Sheer, Lightweight, stiff fabrics
Ramie
-fiber from perennial shrub
-grown in hot and humid climates
-Expensive to produce, import
-usually mixed or blended
- good resiliency - stronger when wet
-silky luster
-brittle
Retting
process of bacterial rotting or decomposing the pectin in plant stems to remove bast fibers
Rush
From stems of marsh plant
Rippling
process of removing seeds by pulling plant through a machine to obtain bast fiber
Scutching
process where bast fiber plant stems are passed through fluted metal rollers or beaten to remove the woody outter layers
Sea Grass
from China or Vietnam
- makes area rugs
Seed Fiber
fiber from plant seed pod

cotton, coir
Sisal
leaf fiber from Africa, Central America, and West indies
- used in algrcultural products rope, bags,
- not used in clothes by itself
-blended w. wool & acrylic
-smooth, straight, yellow
- degraded by saltwater
Tow
short flax fibers or large assembly of filament fibers to facilitate handling and processing during the production of manufactured staple fibers

-fibers less than 10 in.
Transition Cotton
produced on land where organic farming is practiced but where the 3 yr. min. for certification hasnt been met
Wicker
furniture made from tightly twisted paper, yarns, rattan, adn other natural materials
2 Types of jute
Tossa
White
Grades of Sisal
lower- paper industry
medium-agricultural products /ropes
higher- used in carpet
Boll
green seed pod (cotton)
Cotton
1/2 - 2 in. fibers
- longer the fiber = better quality
Classification
describes cotton quality in terms of staple length, grade, and character
Grade
color of fiber without dirt or seeds in it
Staple Length Cotton
based on Length of sample of fibers taken from boll
Character
fiber aspects, maturity, smoothness, etc.
Neps
tangles of cotton fiber
Strict Low- Middling Cotton
used in mass production & cotton- synthetic blends
Mercerization
-for cotton
-treated w/ sodiun hydroxide
-increase absorbency & dyeability
Cotton Durability
-Stronger when wet
-medium resistance to abraison
-yellow in sunlight
2 types of Coir Fibers
Brown & white
BRown Coir fibers
-from mature coconuts
-brushes
-stronger
-contain less cellulose
White Coir Fibers
- from non-mature coconuts
- weaker, finer
- fishing nets - resists saltwater
Dew Retting
- OLD method
- rot bark
- natural bacteria absorbs wood