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30 Cards in this Set

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What is phonetics?
Study of the perception and production of speech sounds.
What are the 6 Branches of Phonetics?
Historical, Physiological, Acoustic, Perceptual, Experimental, and Clinical Phonetics
What is Historical Phonetics?
Study of how speech sounds change over time. Also, it deals with research.
What is Physiological Phonetics?
aka, Articulatory Phonetics. It is the study of how speech sounds are physically made (production part of phonetics). Also, it deals with research.
What is Acoustic Phonetics?
Study of acoustic properties or frequencies of speech sounds (sound as it travels through the air between the speaker's lips & listener's ear). Also, it deals with research.
What is Perceptual Phonetics?
Study of how humans perceive speech sounds (for ex., perception of difference between /m/ and /n/ sounds). Also, it deals with research.
What is Experimental Phonetics?
Laboratory study of physiological, acoustic, & perceptual phonetics (Dr. F. sees this as same as Physiol. Phonetics). Also, it deals with research.
What is Clinical Phonetics?
Study of incorrect speech sounds (what we'll be using phonetics for in SLP). Also, it does not deal with research- it deals with repairing/trying to change behavior (speech).
What is Phonology?
Study of how speech sounds are used in a language; has to do with rules of phoneme placement (its actually a part of Phonetics).
What is a grapheme?
A written letter of the alphabet (not IPA symbol) and its the opposite of a phoneme.
What is the International Phonetic Alphabet (IPA)?
An alphabet used to represent the sounds of the world's languages; promotes a universal method of transcription.
What is a dialect?
when you have slightly different usage patterns of a language (differs in vocab, grammar,...); degree is all that makes 2 of them different in one language.
What are reasons dialects vary?
Regional (based on location), Ethnicity (based on culture), Social class, and Native Language.
What is General American English (GAE)?
aka, Standard American Engilsh... Its a form of English that is relatively devoid of regional characteristics; used by nnational news anchors, in textbooks, ...
What is code switching?
Speaking different dialects in different speech situations.
What is phonetics?
Study of the perception and production of speech sounds.
What are the 6 Branches of Phonetics?
Historical, Physiological, Acoustic, Perceptual, Experimental, and Clinical Phonetics
What is Historical Phonetics?
Study of how speech sounds change over time. Also, it deals with research.
What is Physiological Phonetics?
aka, Articulatory Phonetics. It is the study of how speech sounds are physically made (production part of phonetics). Also, it deals with research.
What is Acoustic Phonetics?
Study of acoustic properties or frequencies of speech sounds (sound as it travels through the air between the speaker's lips & listener's ear). Also, it deals with research.
What is Perceptual Phonetics?
Study of how humans perceive speech sounds (for ex., perception of difference between /m/ and /n/ sounds). Also, it deals with research.
What is Experimental Phonetics?
Laboratory study of physiological, acoustic, & perceptual phonetics (Dr. F. sees this as same as Physiol. Phonetics). Also, it deals with research.
What is Clinical Phonetics?
Study of incorrect speech sounds (what we'll be using phonetics for in SLP). Also, it does not deal with research- it deals with repairing/trying to change behavior (speech).
What is Phonology?
Study of how speech sounds are used in a language (its actually a part of Phonetics).
What is a grapheme?
A written letter of the alphabet (not IPA symbol) and its the opposite of a phoneme.
What is the International Phonetic Alphabet (IPA)?
An alphabet used to represent the sounds of the world's languages; promotes a universal method of transcription.
What is a dialect?
when you have slightly different usage patterns of a language (differs in vocab, grammar,...); degree is all that makes 2 of them different in one language.
What are reasons dialects vary?
Regional (based on location), Ethnicity (based on culture), Social class, and Native Language.
What is General American English (GAE)?
aka, Standard American Engilsh... Its a form of English that is relatively devoid of regional characteristics; used by nnational news anchors, in textbooks, ...
What is code switching?
Speaking different dialects in different speech situations.