Study your flashcards anywhere!

Download the official Cram app for free >

  • Shuffle
    Toggle On
    Toggle Off
  • Alphabetize
    Toggle On
    Toggle Off
  • Front First
    Toggle On
    Toggle Off
  • Both Sides
    Toggle On
    Toggle Off
  • Read
    Toggle On
    Toggle Off
Reading...
Front

How to study your flashcards.

Right/Left arrow keys: Navigate between flashcards.right arrow keyleft arrow key

Up/Down arrow keys: Flip the card between the front and back.down keyup key

H key: Show hint (3rd side).h key

A key: Read text to speech.a key

image

Play button

image

Play button

image

Progress

1/30

Click to flip

30 Cards in this Set

  • Front
  • Back
quiescent

(qui-ES-cent)
(adj) still, inactive


I enjoy the quiescent twilight mornings of snowy winter days in upstate New York.
revelry

(REv-el-ry)
boisterous festivity


The revelry following the Red Sox win in the 2004 World Series was not as out-of-control as the police had expected.
novel
(adj) new or original



Your approach to solving the problem was novel but productive.
squander
(v) to waste

If you choose to squander too much of your income on trivia when you are young, you might not be able to afford your best possible investment --- a house purchased early in life.
ritual
(n) detailed procedure regularly followed


Church liturgies, such as the Catholic Mass, are the formal rituals which are followed during specific services.
perambulate
(v) to stroll

Victorian men might have "perambulated" through Central Park but modern men just take a leisurely "walk" --- unless, of course, someone starts coming up too fast behind them.
redundant
(adj) unnecessarily repetitive; exceeding what is necessary

Your long essays are so redundant that you could say the same things in half the space.
prescient


(PRESH-int)
(adj) having knowledge of things before they occur


Who knows what bits of unusual past experiences actually underly her seemingly prescient behaviors.
foresight
(n) a concern/perception with respect to future occurrences (also: the ability to foresee)

If he had not had the foresight to build two backup pumps into his boat before he started across the ocean, he woud not be here now.
sustain
(v) to maintain (also: support, uphold, undergo)


The secret to studing effectively is to sustain your daily efforts over the whole school year --- not just a week here and a week there.
garrulous

(GARREL-us)
(v) very talkative


Is there anything more garrulous then a group of six girls at a sleep-over.
peregrinate

(PERA-gra-NATE)
(v) to wander from place to place

While perambulating is just walking around, peregrinating is more like taking a real journey on foot.
expound
(v) to explain by presenting in detail


Young Hiltler never missed an opportunity to expound on his message of hatred to the dispossessed and unemployed of post-WWI Germany.
peripatetic

(peri-PA-TETic)
(adj) moving from place to place


A peripatetic person is one who perambulates a lot from one place to another.
digress

(DIE-gress)
(v) to stray from the main topic


One way to confuse your students in a difficult course is to digress frequently to similarly abstruse but unrelated topics.
bibliophile
(n) a book lover


You can easily tell a bibliophile by the size of her personal library.
tome

(toe-m)
(n) book (usually large and scholarly)


He's now eighty-five years old and is still writing scholarly tomes --- though now his emaciated arms can hardly lift them when he is finished.
pundit
(n) an authority or critic


The problem with both ultraliberals and ultraconservatives is that they tend to believe everything their rabid pundits tell them, no matter how silly or dumb.
obsolescent
(adj) becoming obsolete (no longer used)


Even worse than today, in both WWI and WWII the United States entered with mostly obsolescent equipment and had to spend valuble time catching up while soldiers and sailors died needlessly.
tenuous
(adj) weak; insubstantial


Although she now has the lead in the tournment, it's a rather tenuous one at best.
missive
(n) letter


Immediately prior to the USA's entry into WWII, Roosevelt and Churchill communicated frequently through secret missives that historians are only now uncovering and appreciating.
caricature
(n) exaggerated portrait

Every president has to suffer through the frequently inaccurate caricatures of himself put forth by political cartoonists and mouthed by comedians who get a kick putting others down.
travesty
(n) highly inferior imitation of reality


The travesty of justice associated with the death penality is that sometimes the condemned is actually innocent despite the seemingly strong evidence so firmly believed by the jury.
erudition
(n) deep learning


If you go to a good college you will be impressed quickly by the erudition shown by most of your professors compared to that not shown by so many of your high school teachers.
predilection
(n) preference; disposition


I have a predilection to study up too late into the night studying and then spend the next day dangerously groggy in the lab.
puerile

(pew-a-rul)
(adj) childish; immature


Jack, just keep up your puerile behavior and next week someone else will be our quarterback.
lofty
(adj) elevated in nature; noble


THe lofty promises mouthed by many politicians while pandering for votes frequently come down to earth, and even disappear, once elected.
peruse

(pa-RUZ)
(v) to examine, typically with great care


If you don't spend sufficient time perusing these rather complicated instructions, you could easily hurt someone.
articulate

[(adj) = are-TIC-you-lit]

[(v) = are-tic-YOU-LATE]
(adj) speaking in a clear and expressive language; (v) to speak purposefully and clearly

Articulate your words clearly and speak in an articulate manner and most uninformed people will think you know what you are taking about.
sophisticated
(adj) having wordly knowledge or refinement (also: complex)


Rich, and sophisticated in my manner, is the way I want to be when I grow up.